hire

(redirected from hiring)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

hire

verb add to the payroll, appoint, assign to a position, authorize, commission, conducere, contract for, delegate, designate to a post, employ, engage, enlist, fill a posiiion, fill a vacancy, furnish occupation for, give a job to, give employment to, give work to, induct, install, place in office, procure, put on payroll, put to work, recruit, retain, secure the services of, set to work, staff, take into service, take on
Associated concepts: bailee for hire, carriage, contract for hiring, discrimination in hiring, employment contract
See also: delegate, employ, fare, lease, let, pay, procure, rate, retain, revenue, sublease, wage

hire

the letting out of goods for a money consideration. Many such transactions are controlled by the Consumer Credit Act 1974. It can also be used of the hire of work. See also EMPLOYMENT.

HIRE, contracts. A bailment, where a compensation is to be given for the use of a thing, or for labor or services about it. 2 Kent's Com. 456; 1 Bell's Com. 451; Story on Bailm. Sec. 369; see 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 980, et seq; Pothier, Contrat de Louage, ch. 1, n. 1; Domat, B. 1, tit. 4 Sec. 1, n. 1 Code Civ. art.. 1709, 1710; Civ. Code of Lo., art. 2644, 2645. See this Dict. Hirer; Letter.
     2. The contract of letting and hiring is usually divided into two kinds; first, Locatio, or Locatio conductio rei, the bailment of a thing to be used by the hirer, for a compensation to be paid by him.
     3. Secondly, Locatio operis, or the hire of the labor and services of the hirer, for a compensation to be paid by the letter.
     4. And this last kind is again subdivided into two classes: 1. Locatio operis faciendi, or the hire of labor and work to be done, or care and attention to be bestowed on the goods let by the hirer, for a compensation; or,
     5.-2. Locatio operis mercium vehendarum, or the hire and carriage of goods from one place to another, for a compensation. Jones' Bailm. 85, 86, 90, 103, 118; 2 Kent's Com. 456; Code Civ. art. 1709, 1710, 1711.
     6. This contract arises from the principles of natural law; it is voluntary, and founded in consent; it involves mutual and reciprocal obligations; and it is for mutual benefit. In some respects it bears a strong resemblance to the contract of sale, the principal difference between them being, that in cases of sale, the owner, parts with the whole proprietary interest in the thing; and in cases of hire, the owner parts with it only for a temporary use and purpose. In a sale, the thing itself is the object of the contract; in hiring, the use of the thing is its object. Vinnius, lib. 3, tit. 25, in pr.; Pothier, Louage, n. 2, 3, 4; Jones Bailm. 86; Story on Bailm. Sec. 371.
     7. Three things are of the essence of the contract: 1. That there should be a thing to be let. 2. A price for the hire. 3. A contract possessing a legal obligation. Pothier, Louage, n. 6; Civ. Code of Lo. art. 2640.
     8. There is a species of contract in which, though no price in money be paid, and which, strictly speaking, is not the contract of hiring, yet partakes of its nature. According to Pothier, it is an agreement which must be classed with contracts do ut des. (q.v.) It frequently takes place among poor people in the country. He gives the following example: two poor neighbors, each owning a horse, and desirous to plough their respective fields, to do which two horses are required, one agrees that he will let the other have his horse for a particular time, on condition that the latter will let the former have his horse for the same length of time. Du Louage n. 458. This contract is not a hiring, strictly speaking, for want of a price; nor is it a loan for use, because there is to be a recompense. It has been supposed to be a partnership; but it is different from that contract, because there is no community of profits. This contract is, in general, ruled by, the same principles which govern the contract of hiring. 19 Toull. n. 247.
     9. Hire also, means the price given for the use of the thing hired; as, the hirer is bound to pay the hire or recompense. Vide Domat. liv. 1, tit. 4; Poth. Contrat de Louage; Toull. tomes 18, 19, 20; Merl. Repert. mot Louage; Dalloz, Dict. mot Louage; Argou, Inst. liv. 3, c. 27.

References in classic literature ?
Poor old Uncle Silas--why, it's pitiful, him trying to curry favor that way--so hard pushed and poor, and yet hiring that useless Jubiter Dunlap to please his ornery brother.
The Beauforts had been among the first people in New York to own their own red velvet carpet and have it rolled down the steps by their own footmen, under their own awning, instead of hiring it with the supper and the ball-room chairs.
The discussions ended in our hiring for him, by the month, a neat little furnished lodging in a quiet old house near Queen Square.
There was a stock of ladies' and gentlemen's bicycles in a state of disrepair that passes description, and these, the hiring stock, were let to unexacting and reckless people, inexpert in the things of this world, at a nominal rate of one shilling for the first hour and sixpence per hour afterwards.
Then he and eight other gentlemen of about the same age went down in a body to Kew one Saturday, with the idea of hiring a boat there, and pulling to Richmond and back; one of their number, a shock-headed youth, named Joskins, who had once or twice taken out a boat on the Serpentine, told them it was jolly fun, boating!
And there were rough peasants and peasant-women who had come with their selfish requirements, seeking cures or to have doubts about quite practical affairs solved for them: about marrying off a daughter, or hiring a shop, or buying a bit of land, or how to atone for having overlaid a child or having an illegitimate one.
This worried him until the thought came to him of hiring a servant for Gertrude and of buying a bicycle for Marion.
Such information did he gather, over many bottles of beer, that the next afternoon, hiring a small launch at a cost of ten shillings, he journeyed up the harbour to Jackson Bay, where lay the lofty- poled, sweet-lined, three-topmast American schooner, the Mary Turner.
Where we got into a coach, there was no harm in their hiring two inside places.
She can only leave this neighborhood either by hiring a vehicle or by traveling on the railway.
I haven't been in a hackney coach of my own hiring, for thirty years, and I hope I shan't be for thirty more, if I live as long.
Detesting war, the Utopians make a practice of hiring certain barbarians who, conveniently, are their neighbors, to do whatever fighting is necessary for their defense, and they win if possible, not by the revolting slaughter of pitched battles, but by the assassination of their enemies' generals.