hobby loss


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hobby loss

n. in income tax, a loss from a business activity engaged in more for enjoyment than for profit, which can be deducted against annual income only.

References in periodicals archive ?
If a hobbyist engages in some sales transactions and reports this as a dealer, he might be subject to the hobby loss rules, which could vitiate the losses.
That way the cost of the aircraft flows into the business as an expense and reduces the taxable income," says Horton, Some problematic tax issues such as the passive loss rule, hobby loss and related party leasing are less of an issue with this structure.
Not surprisingly, the primary use of the hobby loss provision has
Conversely, the hobby loss rules act to prevent the expensing of what otherwise would be personal expenses disguised as "valid" business expenses, thereby causing significant losses of revenue to the Treasury.
3) The taxpayer's Schedule C occupation--golf instructor--may be subject to the hobby loss rules (which were explained in the audit flag);
The test instrument was based on the facts found in a 1988 Tax Court case (Kimbrough, 55 TCM 730) focusing on the hobby loss vs.
183-2(b)(l) used to determine intent to make a profit under the hobby loss rules to decide whether a taxpayer is a professional gambler:
It appears that an honest misunderstanding of the law is what relieved taxpayers of accuracy-related penalties in three recent hobby loss cases.
20) Two recent cases, both dealing with the common hobby loss from horse-related activities, illustrate the court's methods for assessing the taxpayer's QuickBooks records and how the use to which those records are put can produce opposite results.
Blogs that do not generate a profit for three or more years during a five-year period are presumed to not be profit motivated; therefore, they are subject to the hobby loss limitation (Internal Revenue Code [IRC] section 183[d]).
If the activity is not engaged in for profit, it is subject to the hobby loss rules in Sec.
If the partnership's or S corporation's activity is determined to be a hobby, rather than a business, the hobby income and related expenses would be passed through to the partners or shareholders (who would have to use the regular hobby loss rules--that is, the income shown as other income and the expenses listed on Schedule A as miscellaneous itemized deductions [not exceeding the hobby income]).