hold prisoner

See: confine
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Administrative detention is a procedure that allows the Israeli military to hold prisoners indefinitely on secret information without charging or allowing them to stand trial.
Peter Cuthbertson of the Centre for Crime Prevention said: "It's worth the cost of more prison cells to hold prisoners on remand if it prevents these tragedies.
The Palestine Prisoners' Center for Studies has said that Israeli prison authorities do not provide adequate shelter from rain and cold weather inside prison facilities, some of which -- like Southern Israel's Negev prison -- hold prisoners in tents instead of buildings, World Bulletin reported.
This has been done in view of lack of capacity of KPK jails to hold prisoners above capacity, as despite suspension of the process, prisoners were still being transferred to KP jails.
No places are currently activated under Operation Safeguard, which would see police cells used to hold prisoners, an MoJ spokesman said.
During the late 18th century and early 19th century, the island was mainly used to hold prisoners to be transported to the West Indies and Australia before it was finally closed in 2004.
Firstly, this is far from ideal - they are obviously less secure than prisons, they are not meant to hold prisoners for any length of time, and it means police officers are tied up looking after them when there are better things they should be doing.
In a statement, they said: "Court cells will never be an appropriate place to hold prisoners for anything but a short period, and the underlying message of this report is that they should not be used for overnight, still less weekend, stays.
If allowed to stand, this ruling would permit the government to hold prisoners, potentially indefinitely, without having to show to a court of law why the person has been detained," said Hina Shamsi, deputy director of Human Rights First's Law and Security Program.
Home Secretary John Reid was forced to introduce a scheme called the Operation Safeguard in October to hold prisoners in police cells as the jails overflowed.
Officers there have had about 1,000 detainees to process in the past six months, after Welshpool and Llandrindod Wells Police stations were decommissioned so they could not hold prisoners.
Phone tapping and e-mail evidence, extended power to hold prisoners without trial (it used to be known as internment), trial without juries and now the possibility of judges deciding what will be an infringement of Human Rights.