homiletical


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Thus, by offering a historical and theological analysis of Barth's preaching classroom in Bonn, Hancock offers an important contribution both to the fields of practical theology in its homiletical theories and to ethics, systematics, and historical theologies in their retrieval of Barth's theology as witness in proclamation, life, and service to the church.
The wealth of hermeneutical and homiletical keys in this book is enriching in many ways.
He notes that both of the rabbis he studied carefully structured their sermons and made that structure obvious to the listeners by creating clearly signaled introduction and development sections with a homiletical coda and recapitulation at the end (Saperstein 2000, 12).
The sacramentality of preaching; homiletical uses of Louis-Marie Chauvet's theology of sacramentality.
Anyone who ever heard one of Millard Fuller's presentations received the benefit of some of the best homiletical work done by a lay Baptist person.
Over her adult life, between 1524 and 1558, she produced an impressive literary corpus that includes a variety of genres: homiletical, devotional, polemical, catechetical, exegetical, and pastoral writings, as well as a hymn book.
Osborne describes this process as follows: "The hermeneutical process culminates not in the results of exegesis (centering on the original meaning of the text) but in the homiletical process (centering on the significance of the Word for the life of the Christian today).
Poetic or homiletical adaptation of prophetic style might account for such elements as first-person divine speech.
Yet the specific emphasis on atoning for Christian idolatry is evident in Sephardi homiletical material, for instance, in Abraham Pereyra's La Certeza del Camino (1666), Sixth Tractate, Second Chapter, which assails "the miserable life of those who follow idolatry" in the vain hope that they will avoid inquisitorial scrutiny.
Harvard chaplain Peter Gomes dispenses liberal theology with a homiletical flourish in his bestselling books on the Bible and the "good life.
His homiletical approach is not extraordinary for evangelical preachers, black or white, who were always taught, as the popular injunction had it, to "start low, go slow, rise higher, catch fire, wax warm, quit strong.
It is a homiletical biography exploring King's sermons, his use of language, his delivery and more.