host

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Related to host cell: plasmid, Host range

host

(Multitude), noun a many, a mass of, an abundance of, army, array, assembly, body, cloud, cluster, company, congregation, crowd, crush, flood, galaxy, group, herd, horde, jam, large amount, litter, nest, no end of, numbers, pack, panoply, school, scores, slew, storm

host

(Owner), noun barkeeper, bartender, hostess, hotel keeper, innkeeper, inviter, owner, owner of an estabbishment, proprietor, restaurant owner, saloon keeper, serving liquor, tavern keeper
Associated concepts: host liability statute
See also: body, collection, mass, plurality, quantity
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, the Ap bacteria set themselves up comfortably inside granulocytes and steadily grow for a few days until they rupture their host cells and generate a strong immune response--making an infected person sick.
The team first extracted mRNA from a heart cell, then put it into host cells.
Zoochlorellae divide synchronously within the host cell following host feeding (McAuley, 1982, 1985, 1986); mitosis of digestive cells and their symbiotic algae increases about 12 h after feeding (McAuley, 1982).
RNA: Genetic blueprint enables virus to replicate once it has infected host cell by hijacking cell's protein-making factory
In their investigation, the researchers identified hundreds of microscopic "arms," called P-pili, that enable the bacteria to cling to a host cell.
This biological weapon kills the host cell by piercing the membrane.
As a result, the host cell treats the viral genome as part of its own DNA sequence and begins making the proteins required to assemble new copies of the virus.
Once infected, the host cell then produces new virus particles.
One of the chief mechanisms by which bacterial pathogens manipulate and interact productively with their host is through the secretion of specialized proteins with a variety of biological functions ranging from frank host cell toxicity to more subtle alterations of the host cells' own programmes to the benefit of the invader.
Four excellent chapters describe 6 secretion systems among bacterial pathogens and elucidate the specific mechanisms by which bacterial pathogens usurp intracellular mechanisms of the host cell.
The parasites locate freely within the cytoplasm of the host cell, although each colony appears to be confined to specific domains by the accumulation of intermediate filaments that surround the parasites.
Apicomplexan parasites invade the host cell in an active process that involves gliding motility, formation and movement through the moving junction (MJ) and establishment of a prasitophorous vacuole (PV) around the parasite.