housebreaking

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Housebreaking

The act of using physical force to gain access to, and entering, a house with an intent to commit a felony inside.

In most states, housebreaking that occurs at night constitutes the crime of Burglary. Some statutes expand the definition of housebreaking to include breaking out of a house after entry has been achieved without the use of physical force, such as when access was gained under False Pretenses.

housebreaking

noun appropriation, breaking and entering, burglarizing, burglary, felony, forcible entry, larceny, looting, pilfering, plundering, raiding, robbery, stealing, theft, thievery, trespassing
See also: burglary

housebreaking

in Scots criminal law, strictly speaking only an aggravation of theft and not a nominate crime. It consists in the surmounting of the security of a building or entering it in any unusual way and the ‘house’ part is satisfied if the building concerned has a roof Housebreaking without intent to steal is not a crime in Scots law although it is likely to constitute a criminal offence of being in a building without permission. See BURGLARY.
References in periodicals archive ?
There must be no more wishy- washy excuses for giving housebreakers one last chance.
The crackdown was part of Operation Spotlight, aimed at catching housebreakers, car thieves and drug dealers who use the busy A78 at night.
Baker added: "It's no wonder most Scots are appalled at the decision of the SNP to allow 7000 muggers, housebreakers and even sex offenders to dodge jail.
He later apologised - but yesterday we asked you for your opinion on housebreakers, and were flooded with calls from readers broadly backing the outspoken judge.
So housebreakers are staying home at nights and confidence tricksters are lying low - unless, of course, they're building up funds to buy a seat in the Lords before New Labour leaves office.
And 70 per cent of housebreakers and shoplifters offended again within the same period.
Our remit was catching Glasgow's car thieves and housebreakers and locating unlicensed drinking dens.
The jailing of Mr Nally proved the present laws are little more than a housebreakers charter.
He wants to fill building sites with muggers and housebreakers.
Only a third of ordinary homeowners have an alarm compared with 43 per cent of housebreakers.
Bail jumpers, drug dealers, bag snatchers, housebreakers and persistent offenders would dodge prison.
Housebreakers can be desperate and going for them might result in an innocent person being killed.