house

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house

noun abode, accommodations, aedes, busiiess establishment, business firm, clan, commercial estabbishment, company, concern, domicile, domicilium, domus, dwelling, dwelling place, family, firm, habitation, home, homestead, household, kin, kindred, lineage, living place, living quarters, lodging, place of habitation, quarters, shelter, tribe
Associated concepts: House of Representatives
See also: abode, building, business, concern, domicile, dwelling, enterprise, family, firm, habitation, home, homestead, inhabitation, institute, locate, market, parentage, preserve, protect, protection, shelter, structure

HOUSE, estates. A place for the habitation and dwelling of man. This word has several significations, as it is applied to different things. In a grant or demise of a house, the curtilage and garden will pass, even without the words "with the appurtenances," being added. Cro. Eliz. 89; S. C.; 3 Leon. 214; 1 Plowd. 171; 2 Saund. 401 note 2; 4 Penn. St. R; 93.
     2. In a grant or demise of a house with the appurtenances, no more, will pass, although other lands have been occupied with the house. 1 P. Wms. 603; Cro. Jac. 526; 2 Co. 32; Co. Litt. 5 d.; Id. 36 a. b.; 2 Saund. 401, note 2.
     3. If a house, originally entire, be divided into several apartments, with an outer door to each apartment and no communication with each other subsists, in such case the several apartments are considered as distinct houses. 6 Mod. 214; Woodf. Land. & Ten. 178.
     4. In cases of burglary, the mansion or dwelling-house in which the burglary might be committed, at common law includes the outhouses, though not under the same roof or adjoining to the dwelling-house provided they were within the curtilage, or common fence, as the dwelling or mansion house. 3 Inst. 64; 1 Hale, 558; 4 Bl. Com. 225; 2 East, P. C. 493; 1 Hayw. N. C. Rep. 102, 142; 2 Russ. on Cr. 14.
     5. The term house, in case of arson, includes not only the dwelling but all the outhouses, as in the case of burglary. It is a maxim in law that every man's house is his castle, and there he is entitled to perfect security; this asylum cannot therefore be legally invaded, unless by an officer duly authorized by legal process; and this process must be of a criminal nature to authorize the breaking of an outer door; and even with it, this cannot be done, until after demand of admittance and refusal. 5 Co. 93; 4 Leon. 41; T. Jones, 234. The house may be also broken for the purpose of executing a writ of habere facias. 5 Co. 93; Bac. Ab. Sheriff, N 3.
     6. The house protects the owner from the service of all civil process in the first instance, but not if he is once lawfully arrested and he takes refuge in his own house; in that case, the officer may pursue him and break open any door for the purpose. Foster, 320; 1 Rolle, R. 138; Cro. Jac. 555; Bac. Ab. ubi sup. In the civil law the rule was nemo de domo sua extrahi debet. Dig. 50, 17, 103. Vide, generally, 14 Vin. Ab. 315; Yelv. 29 a, n. 1; 4 Rawle, R. 342; Arch. Cr. Pl. 251; and Burglary.
     7. House is used figuratively to signify a collection of persons, as the house of representatives; or an institution, as the house of refuge; or a commercial firm, as the house of A B & Co. of New Orleans; or a family, as, the house of Lancaster, the house of York.

References in periodicals archive ?
Then they had unmarried sex three times before things, according to records, went wrong between them and they broke up after the man started pushing the housewife to leave her husband and marry him instead.
The 1950s housewife may have occasionally referred to "reducing," but her life wasn't reductionist the way ours is.
When the Emirati housewife told her that she should respect the laws of the nation, the stewardess said that the laws were for the woman and not for her.
This amounts to a win-win situation for the company and the housewife, who in most cases, is working to help supplement her family's income," she said.
Even before suffrage in the United States, with the rise of various magazines catering to the housewife such as Good Housekeeping for example, the status of housewife was starting to become elevated to that of a profession (Pugh 18).
Mr Radhi had said earlier that if a woman, who has been staying in Bahrain on a housewife status, cancels her visa and goes back to her country in order to come back on a work visa, the case will be treated as a fresh one.
But Ms Smith, pictured, MP for Redditch in Worcestershire, said she believed the average West Midlands housewife knew more about how to deal with terrorism than the average MP.
It revealed the average housewife spends four hours and 55 minutes each day looking after the children.
The Japanese housewife is an iconic and integral part of the Japanese populace.
We all came to the conclusion that the next president of the United States should be a housewife.
Anthea Turner is the perfect housewife and the ultimate domestic goddess and she is setting out to try and re-educate the nation's self-confessed incompetent homemakers in a new series, Perfect Housewives coming to Showtime's Style UK from September 21 every Thursday at 19:00 KSA.