Hovel

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HOVEL. A place used by husbandmen to set their ploughs, carts, and other farming utensils, out of the rain and sun. Law Latin Dict. A shed; a cottage; a mean house.

References in classic literature ?
There, amid patches Of garden ground and cornfield, she sees the few wretched hovels of the settlers, with the still ruder wigwams and cloth tents of the passengers who had arrived in the same fleet with herself.
Still bound, most of them, to the soil, as serfs of the land or tenants with definite and heavy obligations of service, living in dark and filthy hovels under indescribably unhealthy conditions, earning a wretched subsistence by ceaseless labor, and almost altogether at the mercy of masters who regarded them as scarcely better than beasts, their lot was indeed pitiable.
The affection which they have for their wretched hovels in country districts is something quite unexplainable.
It must have made some of the pilgrims sit up in their hovels.
Some wretched hovels for the Dutch sailors, resembling great boxes, and after which the place was named, lay about in confused disorder on the opposite bank.
When John-Howard- Philanthropist wants to relieve misery he goes to find it in prisons, where crime is wretched--not in huts and hovels, where virtue is wretched too.
From that short side-street I could see the broad main thoroughfare ruinous and gay, running away, away between stretches of decaying mason ry, bamboo fences, ranges of arcades of brick and plaster, hovels of lath and mud, lofty temple gates of carved timber, huts of rotten mats--an im mensely wide thoroughfare, loosely packed as far as the eye could reach with a barefooted and brown multitude paddling ankle deep in the dust.
With means at hand of building decent cabins, it was wonderful to see how clumsy, rough, and wretched, its hovels were.
Thus, like the tides on which it had been borne to the knowledge of men, the Harmon Murder--as it came to be popularly called--went up and down, and ebbed and flowed, now in the town, now in the country, now among palaces, now among hovels, now among lords and ladies and gentlefolks, now among labourers and hammerers and ballast-heavers, until at last, after a long interval of slack water it got out to sea and drifted away.
She approached one of the wretched hovels by the way-side, and knocked with her hand upon the door.
It gave her a large respect for us, and she strained the lean possibilities of her hovel to the utmost to make us comfortable.
Having levelled my palace, don't erect a hovel and complacently admire your own charity in giving me that for a home.