human

(redirected from humans)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

human

noun being, body, character, human being, individual, living soul, man, member of the human race, one, particular one, party, person, woman
Associated concepts: human rights law, United NationsDeclaration of Human Rights
See also: bodily, character, person, physical
References in classic literature ?
All children could have such recollections if they would press their hands hard to their temples, for, having been birds before they were human, they are naturally a little wild during the first few weeks, and very itchy at the shoulders, where their wings used to be.
By word and sound, to Jerry, "Mister Haggin" had the same connotation that "God" has to God-worshipping humans.
Difficult as this is to accomplish, it is still more difficult to persuade the human into any organised effort to alleviate the ill conditions of the lesser animals.
He must be nursed as you would nurse a human being, a sick child.
Bradley now realized the strategy that the pair had used to capture him and at once concluded that he was in the power of reasoning beings closely related to the human race if not actually of it.
It may serve, let us hope, to symbolise some sweet moral blossom that may be found along the track, or relieve the darkening close of a tale of human frailty and sorrow
An earthly despotism would be the absolutely perfect earthly government, if the conditions were the same, namely, the despot the perfectest individual of the human race, and his lease of life perpetual.
Look where we may, the dark threads and the light cross each other perpetually in the texture of human life.
More potent intoxicants these than any that need licenses for their purveyance, responsible-- see the poets--for no end of human foolishness.
Washington, though in retirement, was brooding over the cruel injustice suffered by his associates in arms, the warriors of the Revolution; over the prostration of the public credit and the faith of the nation, in the neglect to provide for the payments even of the interest upon the public debt; over the disappointed hopes of the friends of freedom; in the language of the address from Congress to the States of the eighteenth of April, 1788--"the pride and boast of America, that the rights for which she contended were the rights of human nature.
The population of the island, Montgomery informed me, now numbered rather more than sixty of these strange creations of Moreau's art, not counting the smaller monstrosities which lived in the undergrowth and were without human form.
I came out of this age of ours, this ripe prime of the human race, when Fear does not paralyse and mystery has lost its terrors.