idiosyncrasy

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Clair, 1999; Paul Robeson, 2010) which upon onset affected not his correct orientation but the idiosyncratically organized peripheral aspects of his personality.
Stakeholder theory and stewardship theory idiosyncratically approach to employees, perceive their role and contribution.
In America, he is considered 'the turf master'; in Britain, the man who, idiosyncratically, trains jumpers on one side of the Atlantic but briefly returned home to almost win the 1987 Champion Hurdle with Flatterer.
But could this idiosyncratically spelt war film be director Quentin Tarantino's finest hou r?
Fischl idiosyncratically features a naked western woman and an empty motorboat in his "Evacuation of Saigon.
Noah Webster's An American Dictionary of the English Language (1828) is a browser's paradise, revealing many words whose meaning has changed since Noah's time and others that he idiosyncratically defined.
There are showers, idiosyncratically housed in an agricultural hopper, and all the tents have their own flush toilets, so there are no midnight dashes across the campsite.
When you make films as idiosyncratically as the Coens do, you have to get them just right; and this is a little misjudged.
The mould-breaking duo, who scored a massive number one hit last year with the idiosyncratically distinctive JCB Song, are famed for the scratch 'n' sniff audience interaction of their live shows.
Waltke idiosyncratically uses the term janus meaning "a traditional transitional saying looking backward and forward" from its current position in the text several times before defining the term (vol.
Professor Frank's five-volume biography of Dostoyevsky is not a page too long: not merely because Dostoyevsky was a great writer (there are many great writers about whom one would not wish to read a five-volume biography), but because an understanding of nineteenth-century Russia, with whose problems Dostoyevsky wrestled so perceptively and prophetically, as well as wrongheadedly and idiosyncratically, is so vital to an understanding of the modern world.
In the heyday of a certain kind of critical reading--allegorical, symbolic, mythic--she seemed idiosyncratically out of step with the work of the modernists, the Beats, the confessional poets.