References in classic literature ?
No one comes or stays in the government offices but idlers, incapables, or fools.
He slept aboard the Idler each night, while I had to go home upon the land to go to bed.
Yet there are many pleasant half-hours to be spent in dipping here and there into the volumes of the Rambler or the Idler.
On the stage of that comedy he had assumed to play the one-night part of a butterfly of fashion and an idler of means and taste.
In summer time, its pumps suggest to thirsty idlers, springs cooler, and more sparkling, and deeper than other wells; and as they trace the spillings of full pitchers on the heated ground, they snuff the freshness, and, sighing, cast sad looks towards the Thames, and think of baths and boats, and saunter on, despondent.
By my faith, senor, hunting and amusements are more fit for idlers than for governors; what I intend to amuse myself with is playing all fours at Eastertime, and bowls on Sundays and holidays; for these huntings don't suit my condition or agree with my conscience.
At this a score of idlers reached him their staves--being ready enough to see another man have his head cracked, even if they wished to save their own--and he took the stoutest and heaviest of all.
The ship drew on and had safely passed the strait, which some volcanic shock has made between the Calasareigne and Jaros islands; had doubled Pomegue, and approached the harbor under topsails, jib, and spanker, but so slowly and sedately that the idlers, with that instinct which is the forerunner of evil, asked one another what misfortune could have happened on board.
A few soldiers, commanded by a sergeant, drove away idlers from the place where the duke had mounted his horse.
They reminded one of a group of idlers gathered about the door of a village tavern when the equipage of some distinguished traveller is brought round previously to his departure.
You are not to credit the idle tales you hear of Natty; he has a kind of natural right to gain a livelihood in these mountains; and if the idlers in the village take it into their heads to annoy him, as they sometimes do reputed rogues, they shall find him protected by the strong arm of the law,”
Should any one seem inclined to enlist, there were officious idlers and busybodies, of that class who are ever ready to dissuade others from any enterprise in which they themselves have no concern.