illegitimate

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Related to illegitimates: illegitimacy, Out-of-wedlock

illegitimate

(Born out of wedlock), adjective bastard, misbegot, misbegotten, nothus, of illicit union, unlawfully begotten, unnatural
Associated concepts: illegitimate children, legitimation, paaernity proceeding, presumption of legitimacy
Foreign phrases: Parentum est liberos alere atiam nothos.It is the duty of parents to support their children even when illegitmate. Qui nascitur sine legitimo matrimonio, matrem sequitur. He who is born out of lawful matrimony succeeds to the condition of his mother. Non est justum aliquem antenatum post mortem facere bastardum qui toto temmore vitae suae pro legitimo habebatur. It is not just to make anyone a bastard after his death, who during his lifeeime was regarded as legitimate. Justum non est aliquem antenatum mortuum facere bastardum, qui pro tota vita sua pro legitimo habetur. It is not just to make a bastard after his death one elder born who all his life has been accounted legitimate. Qui ex damnato coitu nascuntur inter liberos non computentur. They who are born of an illicit union should not be reckoned among the children.

illegitimate

(Illegal), adjective against the law, banned, contrary to law, criminal, forbidden, illicit, impermissible, interdicted, lawbreaking, malfeasant, non legitimus, not according to law, not permitted, outlawed, outside the law, prohibited, prohibited by law, proscribed, unallowed, unauthorized, unlawful, unlicensed, unsanctioned, wrongful
See also: felonious, illegal, illicit, impermissible, improper, irregular, spurious, synthetic, ultra vires, unauthorized, unlawful, wrongful

ILLEGITIMATE. That which is contrary to law; it is usually applied to children born out of lawful wedlock. A bastard is sometimes called an illegitimate child.

References in periodicals archive ?
The liberal Code proved detrimental to illegitimate children and their mothers filing paternity suits, as the Code came to reinforce the patriarchal liberal order.
The Casa de Huerfanos, entrusted by the state with caring for many orphans, further established the children in its care as orphans by denying the existence of their illegitimate fathers.
Using court and notary records, Milanich focuses on families that took in kinless children, as well as the children themselves, to conclude that child circulation constituted a form of welfare provision for illegitimate children.
As a consequence, illegitimate children found themselves in new webs of exploitation and dependencies, as they became domestic labourers in plebeian households.
A woman responding to a survey about the experience of illegitimates in 1986 said that her mother "was put in an orphanage and did not get full knowledge about her parents until she was 55.
As the case of Dorothy Hatcher showed, many illegitimates led completely unsettled home lives, marred by constant shuttling between a variety of guardians and/or state services.
However, illegitimates had the added difficulty of constant questions about their identity.
Another experience shared by illegitimates was the disruption of family relationships, and the tensions this caused in their lives.
In fact, these cases also showed another aspect of the instability of casual "adoptions" of illegitimates by their families.
Not all illegitimates faced hostility from their families and neighbors, but this did not mean that they escaped all the difficulties.
Many illegitimates resented not knowing who their fathers were or any of the circumstances of their births.
It also spotlights the disadvantages endured by women in Florence: female bastards were likelier to enter convents or to get smaller marriage dowries than legitimate girls, poor or servant women were likelier to become pregnant outside marriage, and illegitimate newborn girls were likelier than boys never even to make it to the Ospedale degli Innocenti.