imaginative


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If the imaginative faculty refused to act at such an hour, it might well be deemed a hopeless case.
I met dozens of people, imaginative and unimaginative, cultivated and uncultivated, who had come from far countries and roamed through the Swiss Alps year after year--they could not explain why.
When I tread the old ground, I do not wonder that I seem to see and pity, going on before me, an innocent romantic boy, making his imaginative world out of such strange experiences and sordid things!
For Agatha, prompt to ridicule sentimentality in her companions, and gifted with an infectious spirit of farce, secretly turned for imaginative luxury to visions of despair and death; and often endured the mortification of the successful clown who believes, whilst the public roar with laughter at him, that he was born a tragedian.
Poligny and Debienne, we had been so nicely steeped"--Moncharmin's style is not always irreproachable-- "had no doubt ended by blinding my imaginative and also my visual faculties.
Yet he was a guide of no mean order, who made up for the poverty of what he had to show by a copious, imaginative commentary.
I read that every known superstition in the world is gathered into the horseshoe of the Carpathians, as if it were the centre of some sort of imaginative whirlpool; if so my stay may be very interesting.
For a while the imaginative daring of the artilleryman, and the tone of assurance and courage he assumed, com- pletely dominated my mind.
More the thoughtful and imaginative boy might have mused; but now a large yellow cat, a great favorite with all the children, leaped in at the open window.
The paper is interesting as showing what were the actual experiences out of which he formed his imaginative stories.
It is a question whether we have ever seen the full expression of a personality, except on the imaginative plane of art.
I know it may take more credit than belongs to most pocket-handkerchiefs, to maintain the problem of the virtues of a French governess--a class of unfortunate persons that seem doomed to condemnation by all the sages of our modern imaginative literature.