imperceptive


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Imperceptive again, he claims that she will find "'nobody but Frederick'" in the lodgings: "Such a person to be passed over as a Nobody to her
Other distinctive features of "Dave's Neckliss" are Julius's metaphors and puns, which are at their cleverest, and the tepid responses of both Annie and John, which are uncharacteristically imperceptive (particularly for Annie).
She said I was imperceptive, that I didn't see things very well, and that I could learn a lesson by reading the works of Deborah Jowitt," says Acocella.
irresponsible, unstable, and imperceptive to govern themselves, let
While there are abundant footnotes, which substantiate statements in the main body of the text and contain a mass of additional sources, and despite the impressive expertise invested in the preparation of the fourteen chapters, wishful thinking and imperceptive, but ingenuousness nonetheless, hopes dominate what should have been meticulous scholarship.
English physicians of the 19th century were not imperceptive, and when they named a new disease, we can accept that it was noticeably different from acute rheumatism and from gout.
From early morn they hang about The bookstall, the refreshment-room; They pause and think, as if in doubt Which train to go by; now assume A jaunty air, and now in gloom They take the platform for a stage And pace it, meditating doom--Their own, the world's; in baffled rage Condemning still the imperceptive age.
They presented the socially imperceptive child, defined as having difficulty with "the perception of the total social field, perception of oneself in relation to the behavior of others as well as to events and circumstances that involve others" (p.
But, for whatever reason, Marshak's translations are at worst wooden failures and at best painstaking and conscientious but uneven and sometimes imperceptive versions of Wordsworth's beloved "Lucy" poems.
Imperceptive bystanders are unaware of the "comedy" of gay pick-ups (184, 199).
But Ms Fitzgerald, dressed in sombre black and looking quietly frantic, does it perfectly slowing down the dialogue to a quiet, but intractable insistence on her rights as a woman, a terrific scene shared here with equal strength by Tom Goodman-Hill's pompous, imperceptive Torvald Helmer, although Mr Goodman-Hill with his golden hair does give the impression of an aggravating 20-year-old, who must have married Nora at 14.
In the case of Forms in movement (Galliard), how ever, it is difficult to imagine that even the most imperceptive critic would interpret it as being about stasis.