imperfect

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imperfect

adjective abortive, average, bad, below par, blemished, broken, corrupt, crippled, crude, damaged, decrepit, defective, deficient, deteriorated, disfigured, fair, faulty, feeble, flawed, fragmentary, frail, garbled, hurt, impaired, imperfectus, inadequate, indifferent, inelegant, inexact, inferior, infirm, injured, insufficient, lacking, lame, limited, marred, mediocre, middling, moderate, mutilated, ordinary, out of order, partial, passable, peccable, poor, raw, rickety, rough, ruined, scanty, short, tainted, tolerable, uncompleted, uncultured, undeveloped, unfinished, unpolished, unsatisfactory, unsuitable, wanting, warped, weak
Associated concepts: imperfect description, imperfect grant, imperfect performance, imperfect title
See also: bad, blemished, defective, deficient, dilapidated, errant, fallible, faulty, inchoate, incorrect, inexact, inferior, insufficient, marred, partial, peccable, perfunctory, poor, unsatisfactory, unsound, vicious

IMPERFECT. That which is incomplete.
     2. This term is applied to rights and obligations. A man has a right to be relieved by his fellow-creatures, when in distress; but this right he cannot enforce by law; hence it is called an imperfect right. On the other hand, we are bound to be grateful for favors received, but we cannot be compelled to perform such imperfect obligations. Vide Poth. Ob. arc. Preliminaire; Vattel, Dr. des Gens, Prel. notes, Sec. 17; and Obligations.

References in periodicals archive ?
After they have read the first four pages of text, I test the individual students over their knowledge of the vocabulary and their ability to put verbs from the novella into the imperfect tense.
1] Having made the point, our grammar books go on to designate a perfect tense and imperfect tense.
In sonnet 130, addressed to Dorat, the first poem devoted to Du Bellay's return to France from Rome, Du Bellay plays with an earlier piece, the famous sonnet 31, using the imperfect tense to describe his former naive jealousy of Odysseus/Ulysses who had been able to return home to see his smoking chimney:
The verb that follows, "saying," is in the imperfect tense, indicating a repeated, habitual action -- Jesus customarily or regularly said this.