implode

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implode

verb bankrupt, blow-up, cave, cave in, close, collapse, deflate, disintegrate, end, ended abruptly, fold, fold up, terminate
References in periodicals archive ?
Emil turned to the law firm for guidance on how best to protect its properties from potential damage arising from the implosion, which called for the felling of the approach trusses of the bridge by detonating explosives at key structural points on the bridge and allowing the road bed and its structural components to collapse to the ground below the bridge.
The CBO's analysis suggests that the real effect of ending cost-sharing reductions would not be an implosion of the ACA, but an explosion of the deficit.
The implosion will again take place near "slack tide," the time when tidal fluctuation is at a balance point between ebb and flow to help minimize potential impacts to the environment by maximizing the effectiveness of the Blast Attenuation System.
And that is what this implosion is all about, the support of our students.
In this warfare it is important that implosion is understood as the key to the war effort through kinetic or non-kinetic means.
Glenn Harlan Reynolds, The K-12 Implosion (Jackson, TN: Encounter Books, 2013).
This instability works its way inward, toward the liner's inner surface, throughout the course of the implosion.
Greg Hedges, the building's majority owner, says the implosion cost about 1.
Although the magnet coil surrounding the target introduces an asymmetry that would normally interfere with obtaining a spherically symmetric implosion, a spherical compression was nevertheless achieved using the relatively new technique known as polar direct drive.
Achieving this future (if desired) and avoiding the wild card, of Soviet-style implosion will require the remaking of economic science.
Now an environmental review at the hotel has seen it adopt a glass implosion unit invented by Dorset firm Krysteline.
The proximity to these structures made methods like implosion impossible, says Bailes, so the silos and conveyors had to be taken down manually, piece by piece with a fleet of material handling equipment fixed with specialized demolition attachments such as multi-processors, grapples, hammers and shears.