impotence


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impotence

n. the male's inability to copulate. Impotence can be grounds for annulment of a marriage if the condition existed at the time of the marriage and grounds for divorce whenever it occurs under the laws of 26 states. It should not be confused with sterility, which means inability to produce children.

impotence

noun debilitation, debility, failure, feebleness, helplessness, impotency, impuissance, inability, inadequacy, incapacitation, incapacity, incompetence, incompetency, ineffectiveness, ineffectuality, ineffectualness, inefficacy, inefficiency, ineptitude, infirmitas, lack of power, lack of strength, powerlessness, unfitness, weakness
See also: desuetude, detriment, disability, fault, frailty, impuissance, inability, inaction, incapacity, inefficacy, languor, prostration

IMPOTENCE, med. jur. The incapacity for copulation or propagating the species. It has also been used synonymously with sterility.
     2. Impotence may be considered as incurable, curable, accidental or temporary. Absolute or incurable impotence, is that for which there is no known relief, principally originating in some malformation or defect of the genital organs. Where this defect existed at the time of the marriage, and was incurable, by the ecclesiastical law and the law of several of the American states, the marriage may be declared void ab initio. Com. Dig. Baron and Feme, C 3; Bac. Ab. Marriage, &c., E 3; 1 Bl. Com. 440; Beck's Med. Jur. 67; Code, lib. 5, t. 17, l. 10; Poyn. on Marr. and Div. ch. 8; 5 Paige, 554; Merl. Rep. mot Impuissance. But it seems the party naturally impotent cannot allege that fact for the purpose of obtaining a divorce. 3 Phillim. R. 147; S. C. 1 Eng. Eccl. R. 384. See 3 Phillim. R. 325; S. C. 1 Eng. Eccl. R. 408; 1 Chit. Med. Jur. 877; 1 Par. & Fonb. 172, 173. note d; Ryan's Med. Jur. 95. to 111; 1 Bl. Com. 440; 2 Phillim. R. 10; 1 Hagg. R. 725. See, as to the signs of impotence, 1 Briand, Med. Leg. c. 2, art. 2, Sec. 2, n. 1; Dictionnaire des Sciences Medicales, art. Impuissance; and, generally, Trebuchet, Jur. de la. Med. 100, 101, 102; 1 State Tr. 315; 8 State Tr. App. No. 1, p. 23; 3 Phillm. R. 147; 1 Hagg. Eccl. R. 523; Fodere, Med. Leg. Sec. 237.

References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, a quarter of all cases of impotence arise as an unfortunate side effect of drugs given to treat other conditions.
Bayer will offer a pack of four Levitra tablets - one of three impotence drugs prescribed by the NHS - for just 7.
For a long time the main explanation for impotence was the notion that impotence starts in the head and that it is caused by an inappropriate emotional state.
Some experts want doctors to ask about impotence in over-40s health checks.
Concerned that many men may not be able to bowl their maiden over, Phil is encouraging blokes who may experience impotence to visit http://www.
Starting from the Greek and Roman world, Impotence: A Cultural History proceeds through Christian Europe and the domination of the Church, which discussed impotence in the context of marriage.
He uses early chapters to remind readers that what seems familiar really is not and emphasizes throughout this work that social needs and expectations framed discussions of impotence.
Experts believe cannabis use could be why more younger men and teens are being treated for impotence.
Studies have already claimed cyclists face an increased risk of impotence and now a Japanese team say motorbike riders, of whom there are 3.
THE embarrassing problem of male impotence is being addressed by a specialist at an Edgbaston hospital.
Because impotence is generally regarded as an annoyance rather than a threat to health, the medications that treat it are frequently called "lifestyle drugs.
Impotence is one of those uncomfortable subjects many men would rather stick their hand in a vat of boiling oil than admit to.