References in classic literature ?
For various reasons, however, and from impressions often too vaguely founded to be put on paper, the writer cherishes the belief that many, if not most, of the successive proprietors of this estate were troubled with doubts as to their moral right to hold it.
She listened, she bowed, and she smiled--and, sometimes, she answered; but it was evidently without meaning or interest, until, wearied with his fruitless efforts to make an impression, and perhaps with a hope of exciting a little jealousy, he turned his attention to her more lively companion.
It was silly of him to take offence at what she had said; it was doubtless his own fault; she had not meant to make herself disagreeable: he ought to be accustomed by now to making at first sight a bad impression on people.
And again it became evident how very strong was the impression the young man had made in the household by his one visit there.
But in Martin's estimation the whole tribe of bank cashiers fell a few hundred per cent, and for the rest of the evening he labored under the impression that bank cashiers and talkers of platitudes were synonymous phrases.
The order of the written letters, whatever they might be, was reversed on the face of the impression taken of them by the blotting-paper.
I have sometimes observed that circumstances which have produced a strong impression on patients, when they are in a state of health, give a certain direction to the wandering of their minds, when they are in a state of fever.
I tell you my impression, in all its horror and in all its folly
Now that my mother's idea had found its way from her mind to mine, the impression produced on me was painful in the last degree.
Woodville in your mother's hearing, and twice over, I declare to you on my word of honor, it failed to produce the slightest impression on her.
But it should always be remembered that truth is quite as much a matter of general spirit and impression as of literal accuracy in details of fact.
The generosity of Sophia's temper construed this behaviour of Jones into great bravery; and it made a deep impression on her heart: for certain it is, that there is no one quality which so generally recommends men to women as this; proceeding, if we believe the common opinion, from that natural timidity of the sex, which is, says Mr Osborne, "so great, that a woman is the most cowardly of all the creatures God ever made;"--a sentiment more remarkable for its bluntness than for its truth.