impulse


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

impulse

noun actuation, drive, encouragement, immelling force, impetus, impulsio, impulsion, impulsus, incentive, motivation, motive, pressure, push, spontaneity, spontaneous inclination, stimulant, sudden desire, sudden force, thrust
Associated concepts: heat of passion, impulsive acts, irreeistible impulse, uncontrollable impulse
See also: catalyst, cause, desire, impetus, incentive, motive, passion, reason, stimulus
References in classic literature ?
The practice of inhibiting impulses, which is to a great extent necessary to civilized life, makes mistakes easier, by preventing experience of the actions to which a desire would otherwise lead, and by often causing the inhibited impulses themselves to be unnoticed or quickly forgotten.
Sometimes it seemed to her that to be held tightly and kissed was the whole secret of life, and then a new impulse came and she was terribly afraid.
On the Friday evening before, as she was being driven back to the farm for the week-end by one of the hired men, she had on an impulse done a thing that had startled her, and as John Hardy stood in the darkness below and called her name softly and insis- tently, she walked about in her room and wondered what new impulse had led her to commit so ridicu- lous an act.
It bad stupefied all blessed impulses, and awakened into vivid life the whole brotherhood of bad ones.
And in obedience to the doctor's impulse, home they went.
Obeying an impulse of genuine affection, Henry spoke.
Instantly Rodney clasped her hand in his, with such an impulse of emotion that Henry was annoyed, and rather ostentatiously opened a book.
But Rodney enjoyed the courage which springs from that laughable and lovable defect, and when he had mastered his first impulse, in some way to make a fool of himself, he drew inspiration from the perfect fit of his evening dress.
But from the beginning there was a reawakening of interest in the life of the common people--an impulse which is not inconsistent with the love of the remote and unusual, but rather means the discovery of a neglected world of novelty at the very door of the educated and literary classes.
The first author in whom the new impulse found really definite expression was the Scotsman James Thomson.
The Seasons' was received with enthusiasm not only in England but in France and Germany, and it gave an impulse for the writing of descriptive poetry which lasted for a generation; but Thomson's romantic achievement, though important, is tentative and incomplete, like that of all beginners.
To keep ships afloat is his business; it is his trust; it is the effective formula of the bottom of all these vague impulses, dreams, and illusions that go to the making up of a boy's vocation.