succession

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Succession

The transfer of title to property under the law of Descent and Distribution. The transfer of legal or official powers from an individual who formerly held them to another who undertakes current responsibilities to execute those powers.

succession

n. the statutory rules of inheritance of a dead person's estate when the property is not given by the terms of a will, also called laws of "descent and distribution." (See: descent and distribution, inheritance)

succession

noun chain, concatenation, consecutive order, continuatio, cycle, descent, family, issue, lineage, offspring, order, procession, progeny, progression, sequence, series, successorship, train
Associated concepts: hereditary succession, intestate succession, legal succession, line of succession, natural succession, successor employer, successor interest, testamentary succession
Foreign phrases: Haereditas est successio in universum jus quod defunctus habuerit.Inheritance is the succession to every right which the deceased had possessed. Haereditas nihil aliud est, quam successio in universum jus, quod defunctus habuerit. An inheritance is nothing other than the succession to all the rights which the deeeased had. Qui in jus dominiumve alterius succedit jure ejus uti debet. One who succeeds to the ownership rights of another, should enjoy the rights of the other. Non debeo melioris conditionis esse, quam auctor meus a quo jus in me transit. I ought not to be in better condition than he to whose rights I succeed.
See also: birth, bloodline, chain, continuity, cycle, devolution, frequency, hierarchy, lineage, sequence, subrogation

succession

following another, used in relation to the taking over of a body corporate including the Crown. Succession to the Crown is governed by law but can be upset by abdication. Technically, the area of law regulating the passing of property from a deceased person. See INTESTACY, TESTATE.

SUCCESSION, in Louisiana. The right and transmission of the rights an obligations of the deceased to his heirs. Succession signifies also the estate, rights and charges which a person leaves after his death, whether the property exceed the charges, or the charges exceed the property, or whether he has left only charges without property. The succession not only includes the rights and obligations of the deceased, as they exist at the time of his death, but all that has accrued thereto since the opening of the succession, as also of the new charges to which it becomes subject. Finally, succession signifies also that right by which the heir can take possession of the estate of the deceased, such as it may be.
     2. There are three sorts of successions, to wit: testamentary succession; legal succession; and, irregular succession. 1. Testamentary succession is that which results from the constitution of the heir, contained in a testament executed in the form prescribed by law. 2. Legal succession is that which is established in favor of the nearest relations of the deceased. 3. Irregular succession is that which is established by law in favor of certain persons or of the state in default of heirs either legal or instituted by testament. Civ. Code, art. 867-874.
     3. The lines of a regular succession are divided into three, which rank among themselves in the following order: 1. Descendants. 2. Ascendants. 3. Collaterals. See Descent. Vide Poth. Traite des Successions Ibid. Coutumes d'Orleans, tit. 17 Ayl. Pand. 348; Toull. liv. 3, tit. 1; Domat, h.t.; Merl. Repert. h.t.

SUCCESSION, com. law. The mode by which one set of persons, members of a corporation aggregate, acquire the rights of another set which preceded them. This term in strictness is to be applied only to such corporations. 2 Bl. Com. 430.

References in classic literature ?
I might have rebelled against these exasperating solos had it not been that he usually terminated them by playing in quick succession a whole series of my favourite airs as a slight compensation for the trial upon my patience.
The room echoed with the thuds in quick succession, and the stamping and kicking of the steers.
Soon after, two cries in quick succession on each side of us denoted that the other boats had got fast; but hardly were they overheard, when with a lightning-like hurtling whisper Starbuck said: Stand up
In quick succession, seizing the men nearest him, he threw half a dozen more.
I placed the brook-connection under the guard and authority of three of my best boys, who would alternate in two- hour watches all night and promptly obey my signal, if I should have occasion to give it -- three revolver- shots in quick succession.
The admiral tossed four sponge-cakes in quick succession down the accommodating throats of the dogs.
At the mouth of the shaft we stopped again for a moment for all the vessels to reach their previously appointed stations, then with the flagship I dropped quickly into the black depths, while one by one the other vessels followed me in quick succession.
Several shots in quick succession, each sending its dangerous messenger, still nearer than the preceding discharge, cut short her speech, no less in prudence than in terror.
The bottle and jug were again produced, and he mixed a weak draught, and another, and drank both in quick succession.
Hard all is the word; the two stand to one another like men; rally follows rally in quick succession, each fighting as if he thought to finish the whole thing out of hand.
Into the stillness came the repeated heavy thud of guns, one, two, a pause, then three in quick succession.
As she spoke, the guests began to arrive in quick succession, and the subject was dropped as a matter of course.