succession

(redirected from in rapid succession)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.

Succession

The transfer of title to property under the law of Descent and Distribution. The transfer of legal or official powers from an individual who formerly held them to another who undertakes current responsibilities to execute those powers.

succession

n. the statutory rules of inheritance of a dead person's estate when the property is not given by the terms of a will, also called laws of "descent and distribution." (See: descent and distribution, inheritance)

succession

noun chain, concatenation, consecutive order, continuatio, cycle, descent, family, issue, lineage, offspring, order, procession, progeny, progression, sequence, series, successorship, train
Associated concepts: hereditary succession, intestate succession, legal succession, line of succession, natural succession, successor employer, successor interest, testamentary succession
Foreign phrases: Haereditas est successio in universum jus quod defunctus habuerit.Inheritance is the succession to every right which the deceased had possessed. Haereditas nihil aliud est, quam successio in universum jus, quod defunctus habuerit. An inheritance is nothing other than the succession to all the rights which the deeeased had. Qui in jus dominiumve alterius succedit jure ejus uti debet. One who succeeds to the ownership rights of another, should enjoy the rights of the other. Non debeo melioris conditionis esse, quam auctor meus a quo jus in me transit. I ought not to be in better condition than he to whose rights I succeed.
See also: birth, bloodline, chain, continuity, cycle, devolution, frequency, hierarchy, lineage, sequence, subrogation

succession

following another, used in relation to the taking over of a body corporate including the Crown. Succession to the Crown is governed by law but can be upset by abdication. Technically, the area of law regulating the passing of property from a deceased person. See INTESTACY, TESTATE.

SUCCESSION, in Louisiana. The right and transmission of the rights an obligations of the deceased to his heirs. Succession signifies also the estate, rights and charges which a person leaves after his death, whether the property exceed the charges, or the charges exceed the property, or whether he has left only charges without property. The succession not only includes the rights and obligations of the deceased, as they exist at the time of his death, but all that has accrued thereto since the opening of the succession, as also of the new charges to which it becomes subject. Finally, succession signifies also that right by which the heir can take possession of the estate of the deceased, such as it may be.
     2. There are three sorts of successions, to wit: testamentary succession; legal succession; and, irregular succession. 1. Testamentary succession is that which results from the constitution of the heir, contained in a testament executed in the form prescribed by law. 2. Legal succession is that which is established in favor of the nearest relations of the deceased. 3. Irregular succession is that which is established by law in favor of certain persons or of the state in default of heirs either legal or instituted by testament. Civ. Code, art. 867-874.
     3. The lines of a regular succession are divided into three, which rank among themselves in the following order: 1. Descendants. 2. Ascendants. 3. Collaterals. See Descent. Vide Poth. Traite des Successions Ibid. Coutumes d'Orleans, tit. 17 Ayl. Pand. 348; Toull. liv. 3, tit. 1; Domat, h.t.; Merl. Repert. h.t.

SUCCESSION, com. law. The mode by which one set of persons, members of a corporation aggregate, acquire the rights of another set which preceded them. This term in strictness is to be applied only to such corporations. 2 Bl. Com. 430.

References in classic literature ?
The first intimation they had was when three of their great slave caravans were annihilated in rapid succession.
Taking advantage of the tribal war, the Mahars had gathered their Sagoths in force and fallen upon one tribe after another in rapid succession, wreaking awful havoc among them and reducing them for the most part to as pitiable a state of terror as that from which we had raised them.
Dialogues, choruses and recitations followed each other in rapid succession.
Pesca, inspired by our national grog, which appeared to get into his head, in the most marvellous manner, five minutes after it had gone down his throat, asserted his claims to be considered a complete Englishman by making a series of speeches in rapid succession, proposing my mother's health, my sister's health, my health, and the healths, in mass, of Mr.