regard

(redirected from in regard)
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regard

(Attention), noun advertence, advertency, alertness, application, attentiveness, care, concentration, consideration, examination, heed, heedfulness, interest, mindfulness, notice, observation, scrutiny, vigilance, watch, watchfulness

regard

(Esteem), noun admiration, affection, approbation, approval, attachment, awe, celebrity, consideration, credit, deference, devotion, distinction, estimation, fame, famousness, favor, fondness, good name, honor, interest, judgment, liking, loyalty, note, opinion, reputability, reputation, repute, respect, reverence, studium, valuation, value, veneration

regard

(Hold in esteem), verb admire, adore, approve, be fond of, be impressed, be in awe, care for, cherish, defer to, esteem, exalt, extol, glorify, have a likkng for, have regard for, hold a high opinion of, hold dear, hold in affection, hold in regard, honor, idolize, look up to, pay homage to, pay tribute, praise, prize, respect, respicere, reverence, think highly of, think well of, treasure, value, venerate, worship

regard

(Pay attention), verb advert to, attend, be attentive, be aware of, be conscious of, be mindful, bear in mind, behold, consider, contemplate, deem, ducere, gaze, give heed to, heed, keep in sight, look, look at, look upon, mark, mind, note, notice, observare, observe, perceive, scan, scrutinize, see, survey, take cognizance of, take notice, think about, view, watch, witness
Associated concepts: due regard
See also: affection, appertain, apply, aspect, care, caution, character, complexion, concern, consider, consideration, credit, deem, defer, deference, diligence, discern, estimation, fulfill, hear, heed, homage, honor, interest, involve, keep, mention, note, notice, observation, observe, opine, outlook, perceive, perception, pertain, prestige, presuppose, prudence, recognition, reputation, respect, surmise, watch, worth
References in classic literature ?
I believe I had no critical reserves in regard to them, but simply they did not take my fancy.
So that the greatest advantage I derived from the study consisted in this, that, observing many things which, however extravagant and ridiculous to our apprehension, are yet by common consent received and approved by other great nations, I learned to entertain too decided a belief in regard to nothing of the truth of which I had been persuaded merely by example and custom; and thus I gradually extricated myself from many errors powerful enough to darken our natural intelligence, and incapacitate us in great measure from listening to reason.
There was much that was false and harmful in this outlook, as concerning the laxity the men permitted themselves, but in regard to the women that old-fashioned view