open

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Open

To make accessible, visible, or available; to submit to review, examination, or inquiry through the elimination of restrictions or impediments.

To open a judgment means to render it capable of reexamination by removing or relaxing the bar of its finality. A judgment is ordinarily opened at the insistence of a party who is able to show good cause as to why the execution of the judgment would be inequitable.

To open a court is to formally announce, ordinarily through the bailiff, that the session has commenced and that the business before the tribunal will proceed.

The term open is also used as an adjective in reference to that which is patent, visible, apparent, or notorious, such as a defect in a product, or conduct such as lewdness.

open

(Accessible), adjective allowable, allowed, approachable, attainable, available, defenseless, fit for travel, free of access, free to all, insecure, navigable, obtainable, patere, permitted, pregnable, procurable, public, securable, susceptible, unbarred, unblocked, unenclosed, unfenced, unfortified, unguarded, unlocked, unobstructed, unoccupied, unrestricted, unshielded, vacated, vulnerable, within reach
Associated concepts: open account, open market, open shop

open

(In sight), adjective apparent, bare, blatant, clarus, clear, conspicuous, discernible, distinct, evident, exposed, exposed to view, glaring, in full view, manifest, manifestus, marked, noticeable, observable, obvious, outstanding, overt, patent, perceivable, perceptible, perspicuous, plain, prominent, pronounced, recognizable, revealed, salient, seeable, transparent, unclouded, unconcealed, uncovered, undisguised, unhidden, unmistakable, unobstructed, unsecluded, unsheltered, unshielded, visible
Associated concepts: open and notorious possession, open court

open

(Persuasible), adjective acquiescent, amenable, apertus, candidus, flexible, impressible, impressionable, inducible, influenceable, malleable, movable, persuadable, pervious, receptive, respondent, sensitive, simplex, suasible, suggestible, swayable, sympathetic, tractable

open

(Unclosed), adjective adapertus, agape, ajar, coverless, dehiscent, gaping, lidless, patens, patulous, spacious, spread out, unclogged, uncorked, unfastened, unfurled, unlatched, unlocked, unsealed, unshut, unstoppered, wide, yawning
See also: aleatory, apparent, available, bare, bona fide, break, candid, commence, conspicuous, denude, direct, equivocal, establish, evident, explicit, flagrant, forthright, generate, honest, impartial, indeterminate, ingenuous, initiate, launch, liberal, manifest, naive, naked, obvious, open-minded, originate, outstanding, overt, passable, patent, penetrable, perceivable, perceptible, preface, pullulate, receptive, reveal, scrutable, separate, simple, sincere, split, spread, straightforward, suasible, subject, susceptible, unaffected, unbiased, uncertain, undecided, unmistakable, unprejudiced, unrestricted, unsettled, vacant, vulnerable

TO OPEN, OPENING. To open a case is to make a statement of the pleadings in a case, which is called the opening.
     2. The opening should be concise, very distinct and perspicuous. Its use is to enable the judge and jury to direct their attention to the real merits of the case, and the points in issue. 1 Stark. R. 439;S. C. 2 E. C. L. R. 462; 2 Stark. R. 31; S. C 3 Eng. C. L. R. 230.
     3. The opening address or speech is that made immediately after the evidence has been closed; such address usually states, 1st. The full extent of the plaintiff's claims, and the circumstances under which they are made, to show that they are just and reasonable. 2d. At least an outline of the evidence by which those claims are to be established. 3d. The legal grounds and authorities in favor of the claim or of the proposed evidence. 4th. An anticipation of the expected defence, and statement of the grounds on which it is futile, "either in law or justice, and the reasons why it ought to fail. 3 Chit. Pr. 881; 3 Bouv. Inst. n. 3044, et seq. To open a judgment, is to set it aside.

References in classic literature ?
At this dim inceptive stage of the day Tess seemed to Clare to exhibit a dignified largeness both of disposition and physique, an almost regnant power, possibly because he knew that at that preternatural time hardly any woman so well endowed in person as she was likely to be walking in the open air within the boundaries of his horizon; very few in all England.
It was so with Ahab; only that now, of late, he seemed so much to live in the open air, that truly speaking, his visits were more to the cabin, than from, the cabin to the planks.
Next to the commonalty of husbandmen is one of shepherds and herdsmen; for they have many things in common with them, and, by their way of life, are excellently qualified to make good soldiers, stout in body, and able to continue in the open air all night.