inactivate

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21 /PRNewswire/ -- Pharmacia & Upjohn today announced the availability of AROMASIN(R) (exemestane tablets), the first oral aromatase inactivator for the treatment of postmenopausal women with advanced breast cancer whose tumors stop responding to tamoxifen therapy.
Aromasin (exemestane tablets) is the first oral aromatase inactivator for the treatment of advanced breast cancer in postmenopausal women.
Isolation of a fragment (C3a) of the third component of complement containing anaphylatoxin and chemotactic activity and description of an anaphylatoxin inactivator of human serum.
As previously announced, it has received FDA approval for Aromasin (exemestane tablets), the first oral aromatase inactivator for the treatment of advance breast cancer in postmenopausal women.
Besides protecting laboratory personnel from accidental exposure to pathogenic viruses in blood samples from infected subjects, the viral inactivator could significantly reduce the occurrence of blood-transmitted diseases, including HIV-1, poliovirus, foot-and-mouth disease virus, influenza, encephalomyocarditis virus (a model virus for hepatitis A), bovine diarrhea virus (a model virus for hepatitis C), equine encephalitis virus, and Ebola.
Developed by Pharmacia & Upjohn, Aromasin is the first aromatase inactivator for use in advanced breast cancer in patients whose tumors stop responding to tamoxifen therapy.
3; also known as lysine carboxypeptidase, kininase I, anaphylatoxin inactivator, or plasma carboxypeptidase B) and the more recently identified carboxypeptidase U (CPU; EC 3.
BPI is a human neutrophil protein which serves as the body's natural inactivator of endotoxin and may have potential therapeutic value for the treatment of septic shock, adult respiratory distress syndrome, and other disorders resulting from Gram-negative bacterial infection in the blood and other tissues.
BPI is a human neutrophil protein which serves as the body's natural inactivator of bacterial endotoxin and may have therapeutic value for the treatment of life-threatening conditions including adult respiratory distress syndrome, hemmorhagic shock and lethal complications of infection, burns and trauma.
But the need for specific inactivators for different mycotoxins and the environmental concerns about inorganic absorbents acts as restraints for the market globally.
He examines preservatives in each category and sub-category, with information on specific regulations, chemistry, ingredient review, non-cosmetic approvals and uses, producers, purity and available combinations, solubility, activity, inactivators, methods of incorporation, analyzing finished formulations, and safety ratings.