inarticulate

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inarticulate

adjective abstruse, abysmal, close, deficient, deprived of speech, fumbling, garbled, guarded, inadequate, inaudible, incommunicative, inconversable, indiscernible, indistinct, ineffective, inelegant, inferior, laconic, muffled, mute, nebulous, not able to vocalize a position, not fluent, not glib, not polished, not smooth, opaque, parum distinctus, poor, reserved, reticent, silent, sparing of words, taciturn, tongue-tied, unclear, unintelligible, unplain, unrefined, untrained, vague, withdrawn
See also: mute, speechless, taciturn
References in periodicals archive ?
Yuknavitch herself writes in an unsparing prose, a difficult mixture of painful lyricism and staccato abstraction which voices her characters' desperate inarticulacy.
In his so-called caviar paintings, begun in 1989, inarticulacy is exchanged for a self-consciously beautiful image.
By turns heroic, anti-heroic, ironic, anguished and almost unbearably poignant (as in the magnificent slow movement of the First Violin Concerto, where the soloist seems stunned into stuttering inarticulacy at one point by the sheer tragic beauty of the music), it is classical music for what is still -regrettably, in many respects - the modern age.
With the mundanity comes a certain inarticulacy and the short story also relies, as already argued, on a strategic use of silence.
It would be tempting to think that such stunning inarticulacy as this was owing to the unwonted constraints on her hair cutting off the blood supply to her brain, but the evidence from Miss Wolf's writing is overwhelming that this is the true, the native Wolf-note wild.
Children inhabit the novel's eponymous dark, defenceless before the corruptions of an adult world that consistently ignores their needs and rights and takes advantage of their inarticulacy.
The moment his pent-up passions finally burst free of his emotional inarticulacy is one of the best bits of cinema I've seen all year.
Even so, it was a major surprise to see American playwright David Mamet, the poet of low-life inarticulacy, directing a film version of it a few years ago.
A central part of the narrative in the longest story in the volume, 'Baptizing', is consumed by the issue of a spreading, contaminating male silence; with the single exception of Jerry Storey, whose IQ disqualifies him from full participation in small or large-town life, the men who feature here are associated with failure of expression, with inarticulacy.