inartistic


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In a report on San Francisco, Olmsted denounced the grid-style street arrangements as 'formal and repetitive' with 'a dull and inartistic appearance'.
Such an argument might have immunised the poetry from inartistic interference from the outset but at least the Court in this case acknowledged in the course of its deliberations that the poetry collection was primarily a literary, as opposed to a political, work.
To return to Socrates' initial criticism of current rhetorics--that they are inartistic because they lack a grounded account of the soul and offer instead only untheorized strategies that are at best preliminaries to the art.
ending, patronized by Henry James as an inartistic longing for "a
If these wartime sentiments infused propaganda and social commentary, they found their most compelling expression inartistic forms, ranging from jubilant novels of local solidarity to urban musical pageants, cross-cultural community arts festivals to didactic radio plays.
When one is offered such a tremendous adventure, it would be too inartistic to refuse it.
She sees these generally inartistic images as not just private records of the life of a family but as media that bind families and friends together over long distances.
He sagely informed his audience: "It may surprise some of our readers when we calmly state, strange as it may seem, that, far from being the centre and hotbed of all that is inartistic and ugly, the Birmingham of today is perhaps the most artistic town in England.
While it acknowledges the ambivalence of the sacred, Soyinka's theory of tragedy is profoundly aesthetic and metaphysical, but "this deliberate aestheticisation cradles a specific polemic position: one that contests the European ethnographer's relegation of African ritual practices to the inartistic, the merely religious.
Further, they had been instructed in how to read Robinson's art in Metropolitan's October 1915 issue: "He maintains that a picture is finished as soon as the idea sought is expressed; to polish a surface and 'tickle it up' is at once inartistic and trivial" (qtd.
What Wellek and Warren seem to suggest is that plagiarism is often the result of inartistic use of literary borrowings.
But you will tell me this is an inartistic age, and we are an inartistic people, and the artist suffers much in this nineteenth century of ours.