incident

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incident

adjective accessory, affiliated, allied, apperraining to, apropos, associated, bearing upon, belonging, circumstantial, collateral, connected, contextual, contingent, correlative, dependent on, following upon, implicated, in connection with, in relation to, inherent in, pertaining to, reeated to, relating to, relative to, subject to, subsidiary
Associated concepts: customarily incident, necessary and innident to

incident

noun affair, case, casus, contingency, episode, event, experience, happening, occasion, occurrence, pass, proceeding
See also: accident, appurtenant, casualty, contingency, event, experience, happening, occasion, occurrence, particular

INCIDENT. A thing depending upon, appertaining to, or following another, called the principal.
     2. The power of punishing for contempt is incident to a court of record; rent is incident to a reversion; distress to rent; estovers of woods to a tenancy for a life or years. 1 Inst. 151; Noy's Max. n. 13; Vin. Ab. h.. t.; Dane's Ab. h.t.; Com. Dig. h.t., and the references there; Bro. Ab. h.t.; Roll's Ab. 75.

References in classic literature ?
As for Tess Durbeyfield, she did not so easily dislodge the incident from her consideration.
The incidents of the legend become the hero's surest passport to immortality.
It was not for their tameness, but for their impassioned sincerity, that he chose incidents and situations from common life, "related in a selection of language really used by men.
And now it was destined that they should experience the one keen sensation of their later years, the one memorable incident from which all future incidents should be dated.
But even as expounded by its author it does not explain, and in truth is incompatible with some incidents of, the occurrences related in these memoranda: for example, the sound of Charles Ashmore's voice.
Nor shall I recount further incidents of the life that is now to end--a life of wandering, always and everywhere haunted by an overmastering sense of crime in punishment of wrong and of terror in punishment of crime.
These qualities, it is true, are those pre-eminently of the "Works and Days": the literary values of the "Theogony" are of a more technical character, skill in ordering and disposing long lists of names, sure judgment in seasoning a monotonous subject with marvellous incidents or episodes, and no mean imagination in depicting the awful, as is shown in the description of Tartarus (ll.
The incidents, however, have all the further fascination of supernatural romance; and the union of this element with the homely sincerity of the style accounts for much of the peculiar quality of the book.
Many notable discoveries will, I doubt not, be made by such, of the transactions which happened in the family of our worthy man, during all the years which we have thought proper to pass over: for though nothing worthy of a place in this history occurred within that period, yet did several incidents happen of equal importance with those reported by the daily and weekly historians of the age; in reading which great numbers of persons consume a considerable part of their time, very little, I am afraid, to their emolument.
No incidents have hitherto befallen us that would make a figure in a letter.
When the writer of these introductory lines (Walter Hartright by name) happens to be more closely connected than others with the incidents to be recorded, he will describe them in his own person.
Thought has always its efficacy, and every striking incident its moral.