incorporeal

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Related to incorporeality: immateriality, incorporeal being, materialities

Incorporeal

Lacking a physical or material nature but relating to or affecting a body.

Under Common Law, incorporeal property were rights that affected a tangible item, such as a chose in action (a right to enforce a debt).

Incorporeal is the opposite of corporeal, a description of the existence of a tangible item.

incorporeal

adj. referring to a thing which is not physical, such as a right. This is distinguished from tangible.

incorporeal

adjective asomatous, bodiless, immaterial, immateriate, impalpable, incorporal, nonphysical, not of material nature, spiritual, unbodied, unembodied, unfleshly, unsubstantial, unworldly, without body, without substance
Associated concepts: incorporeal chattels, incorporeal hereditament
Foreign phrases: Haereditas, alia corporalis, alia incorpooalis; corporalis est, quae tan gi potest et videri; incorroralis quae tangi non potest nec videri.An inheritance is either corporeal or incorporeal; corporeal is that which can be touched and seen; incorporeal is that which can neiiher be touched nor seen.
See also: immaterial, impalpable, insubstantial, intangible

incorporeal

that which has no corpus, or body, so cannot be touched.

INCORPOREAL. Not consisting of matter.
     2. Things incorporeal. are those which are not the object of sense, which cannot be seen or felt, but which we can easily, conceive in the understanding, as rights, actions, successions, easements, and the like. Dig. lib. 6, t. 1; Id. lib. 41, t. 1, l. 43, Sec. 1; Poth. Traite des Choses, Sec. 2.

References in periodicals archive ?
Eugene Dawn poses the imperial encounter between America and Vietnam in terms of the conceptual relationship between subject and object, Self and Other, the corporeality of the body and the incorporeality of the mind.
As such, the pain that circulates upon the body affirms the difference between the corporeality of the real and the incorporeality of the idea, and thereby provides an access point to the ontological condition of an "own true being" that conditions both narratives of Dawn and Jacobus.
66) It is incorporeal, and this incorporeality is the very thing that gives the soul its qualitative superiority over the body.
The book analyzes attributes commonly associated with God: substantiality, incorporeality, necessary existence, eternality, omniscience, goodness, virtue and morality, and omnipotence.
When Bourdin again quotes Descartes's statement of what he formerly understood by "soul," in section four, he similarly directs all his comments to the question of the soul's incorporeality, arguing that Descartes has not sufficiently proven it.
Among the considerations are new garments for biblical Joseph, the incorporeality of God in Origen's exegesis, messianism in modern Jewish thought, and soteriological metaphysics in Schleiermacher's interpretations of Colossians 1:15-20.
s contrast between William's nonhylomorphic conception of the soul as pure, immaterial form (86) and Augustine's insistence on the soul's incorporeality and materiality.
Among the considerations are new garments for biblical Joseph, the incorporeality of God in Origin's exegesis, messianism in modern Jewish thought, and soteriological metaphysics in Schleiermacher's interpretations of Colossians 1:15-20.
Thus, "it must not be supposed that by embracing hylomorphism" Aristotle "has immunized himself from considerations that lead to Platonic dualism, principally the incorporeality of thought," and if it seems that "Aristotle's position is incoherent, that incoherence is in harmony with Plato's" (p.
He arrives at this subject for the first time in the third section of the Guide, after he has concluded the thematic treatment of at least the following themes: (1) the names and attributes of God (I 1-70); (2) the proof of the existence, unity, and incorporeality of God (I 71-II 1); (3) the separate intelligences and the order of the world (II 2-12); (4) the creation of the world (II 13 (1)-31); and (5) prophecy (II 32-48).
33) The same suggestion is repeated later when Tzamalikos says that "for Origen incorporeality and reality are not incompatible ontological realities, as they virtually are for the Stoics.
Part 5 ("The Theistic Conception of God") addresses the primary attributes of the God of theism--being, omnipotence, omniscience, incorporeality, beauty, omnipresence--and the relationship of God to creation (foreknowledge and human freedom, divine action, creation and conservation).