indemonstrable


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indemonstrable

adjective containing variables, doubting, equivocal, incalculable, indecisive, inexplicit, irresolute, irresponsible, not ascertainable, not provable, skeptical, uncertain, unconfirmable, unconvinced, unprovable, unsure, unverifiable
Associated concepts: indemonstrable principles
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Moral reasoning proceeds from controversial premises, and no argument can avoid "dependence, conscious or unconscious, on indemonstrable first premises, over and above the presuppositions of reasoning as such.
s own psychoanalytic premises are not sometimes as indemonstrable and dogmatic as religious doctrines.
With the rise of the universities and the 12th century recovery of Aristotle's texts, Koterski explains, new dialectical methods of reasoning and philosophical faith in indemonstrable first principles were generated, giving rise to a sharper distinction between theology and philosophy, but never (despite fideist and nominalist tendencies) to a complete severance.
Both the speculative and the practical intellects must begin with indemonstrable first principles which are knowable immediately upon an intellectual encounter with being; these first principles are held by the habits of "understanding" (125) and "synderesis," (126) respectively.
The premises must be primary and indemonstrable, or else they would themselves require proof.
Besides the indemonstrable formula of whatness ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), one type of definition is a deduction of whatness, differing from a demonstration only in form.
47) The reason for this is that the premises in a demonstration must themselves be indemonstrable.
Thus, there are two kinds of propositions within a science--those that are demonstrable, and those that are indemonstrable or self-evident.
Other potentially ambivalent notions concerning demonstrative reasoning are distinguished: "thesis" as immediate indemonstrable first principle that need not be grasped for acquiring certain kinds of knowledge; "axiom" as that which must be grasped for any knowledge acquisition; "hypothesis" as a thesis which assumes one or another part of a proposition; "definition" as not assuming either; and "first principles" as facts that cannot be shown (pp.
For a contemporary exegete, the legitimacy of attributing to Aristotle the doctrine of synderesis (the innate habit of the indemonstrable practical precepts which are the "guardian of morality" [p.
As Strauss emphasizes, the concept of Glaube at the heart of Jacobi's doctrine is not primarily religious: it comprises both "faith" and "belief' in the Humean sense, according to which human knowledge is ultimately based on indemonstrable beliefs.
To acknowledge that such preconditions are rationally indemonstrable is not to concede that they are irrational.