inference


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Related to inference: Statistical inference, Type inference, Inference rules

Inference

In the law of evidence, a truth or proposition drawn from another that is supposed or admitted to be true. A process of reasoning by which a fact or proposition sought to be established is deduced as a logical consequence from other facts, or a state of facts, already proved or admitted. A logical and reasonable conclusion of a fact not presented by direct evidence but which, by process of logic and reason, a trier of fact may conclude exists from the established facts. Inferences are deductions or conclusions that with reason and common sense lead the jury to draw from facts which have been established by the evidence in the case.

inference

n. a rule of logic applied to evidence in a trial, in which a fact is "proved" by presenting other "facts" which lead to only one reasonable conclusion--that if A and B are true, then C is. The process is called "deduction" or "deductive reasoning," and is a persuasive form of circumstantial evidence. (See: circumstantial evidence)

inference

noun allusion, assumption, conclusio, coniectura, conjecture, deduction, guess, hint, hypothesis, illation, implication, impression, inkling, judgment, observation, postulate, postulation, premise, presupposal, presupposition, speculation, supposal, supposition, surmise, suspicion, theorem, theory, thesis, understanding
Associated concepts: evidentiary inference, favorable inferrnce, legal inference, legitimate inference, presumption
Foreign phrases: Expressa nocent, non expressa non nooent.Things expressed may be prejudicial; that which is not expressed will not.
See also: conclusion, conjecture, connotation, construction, determination, generalization, hint, hypothesis, idea, innuendo, insinuation, intimation, mention, presumption, reference, referral, signification, speculation, suggestion, suspicion, uncertainty

INFERENCE. A conclusion drawn by reason from premises established by proof.
     2. It is the province of the judge who is to decide upon the facts to draw the inference. When the facts are submitted to the court, the judges draw the inference; when they are to be ascertained by a jury, it is their duty to do so. The witness is not permitted as a general rule to draw an inference, and testify that to the court or jury. It is his duty to state the facts simply as they occurred. Inferences differ from presumptions. (q.v.)

References in classic literature ?
But Agatha had drawn the new inference from the old facts, and would not be talked out of repudiating it.
But I do not mean by this to draw the inference that no credit is to be allowed for the work of translating, for a man may employ himself in ways worse and less profitable to himself.
In this, as appears to me, I was successful enough; for, since I endeavored to discover the falsehood or incertitude of the propositions I examined, not by feeble conjectures, but by clear and certain reasonings, I met with nothing so doubtful as not to yield some conclusion of adequate certainty, although this were merely the inference, that the matter in question contained nothing certain.
No inference can be drawn from this circumstance as to the probability of the words attributed to him having been actually uttered.
The inference to which we are brought is, that the CAUSES of faction cannot be removed, and that relief is only to be sought in the means of controlling its EFFECTS.
It was begun after you had left, and was an imitation of you, and in that diary she traces by inference certain things to a sleep-walking in which she puts down that you saved her.
Again, there is a composite kind of recognition involving false inference on the part of one of the characters, as in the Odysseus Disguised as a Messenger.
So true is this, that when a man is by nature liable to such affections, arising from some concomitance of elements in his constitution, it is a probable inference that he has the corresponding complexion of skin.
The gay trifling of Miss Osgood aided greatly both in cooling his spleen and removing his melancholy, till in the course of a month he even proceeded so far as to make her the confidant of what she already knew, though only by conjecture and inference.
Arthur felt a startled uncertainty how far Adam was speaking from knowledge, and how far from mere inference.
Is it, then, stretching our inference too far to say that the presentation was on the occasion of the change?
others, from which some physiologists have drawn the inference that