inflection

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Related to inflective: inflexed

inflection

noun accent, accentuation, cadence, expression, intonation, modulation, pitch, stress, tone, voice change
Associated concepts: demeanor of a witness, polygraph test
See also: intonation, stress
References in periodicals archive ?
And it is evident in the inflective music of her utterances.
Its Latin aspect, which made its way into English via Norman French, is inflective.
On the other hand, when persons injured in the right anterior hemisphere lose the ability to express the tonal, inflective, or nonverbal aspects of emotion, they sound flat and uninterested.
His impressive background in the design and building materials space will serve him well in his new role, and we look forward to inflective growth under his leadership.
On the lexicographical side, gathering a list of verbal lemmata and filing them into a database is relevant because the standard dictionaries of Old English, including An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary and The student's Dictionary of Anglo-Saxon, do not offer an exhaustive inventory of the inflective forms of each headword and The Dictionary of Old English, which does, is still in progress (the letter G was published in 2008).
The sum of these activities, together with her own studio work, constitutes a mutually inflective practice in which Grabner's paintings, drawings, and prints mine the interstices of both material and social fabrics.
are treated as exclusively inflective and, consequently, left out of the inventory of suffixes selected for the analysis.
For example, faer, which is a bare stem, represents an instance of zero-derivation proper whereas bryce, with a final -e morpheme, is a case of overlapping of inflection and derivation, given that the morpheme performs an inflective and a derivational function simultaneously.
On the other hand, inflective languages have the following features:
The inflective loop may need to cover about a perfect fifth (from a third below to a third above the indicated pitch of turning) for one to fully experience the shift, since a vowel's transition is gradual and spreads over an interval of about a major second to a major third.