injunctive relief


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injunctive relief

n. a court-ordered act or prohibition against an act or condition which has been requested, and sometimes granted, in a petition to the court for an injunction. Such an act is the use of judicial (court) authority to handle a problem, and is not a judgment for money. Whether the relief will be granted is usually argued by both sides in a hearing rather than in a full-scale trial, although sometimes it is part of a lawsuit for damages and/or contract performance. Historically, the power to grant injunctive relief stems from English equity courts rather than damages from law courts. (See: injunction, writ, equity, permanent injunction)

References in periodicals archive ?
In the action, Wintergreen alleges claims for declaratory judgment and injunctive relief, and also moved for a speedy hearing and to shorten the time for defendants to respond to discovery requests.
A claimant may seek injunctive relief either pre-arbitration in connection with an action to enforce an arbitration agreement, or post-arbitration in connection with a proceeding to confirm an arbitration award.
The group filed a class action lawsuit against the company, seeking injunctive relief.
The typical cost of the entire injunctive relief action should be no more than a few thousand dollars.
Two days after that ruling was issued, a federal district court in Mississippi cited Gibson approvingly but dismissed ADA claims for injunctive relief and money damages brought by the United States on behalf of an individual.
The CMA lawsuit asks for injunctive relief for the physicians of California from several alleged activities:
The SEC commenced its action in June 1985 and subsequently filed a complaint for permanent injunctive relief against Price and former officers and directors of AM.
Grant the same type of injunctive relief available in private suits;
With its lawsuit, Cisco is seeking injunctive relief to prevent Apple from copying Cisco's iPhone trademark.
The appeals court held that fact issues, as to whether the prisoner was afforded basic levels of humane care and hygiene, precluded summary judgment on the prisoner's [section] 1983 claims for monetary damages and injunctive relief under the Eighth Amendment.
Although he reduced the damages award, Judge Shabaz also entered injunctive relief in favor of the plaintiffs.