inscription

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inscription

noun autograph, caption, dedication, engraving, entry, index, inscriptio, legend, mark, record, superscription, titulus, written matter
Associated concepts: inscribed securities, registration of a deed
See also: caption, dedication, designation, entry, marginalia, notation, phrase, record, title

INSCRIPTION, civil law. An engagement which a person, who makes a solemn accusation of a crime against another, enters into, that he will suffer the same punishment, if he has accused, the other falsely, which would have been inflicted upon him had he been guilty. Code, 9, 1, 10; Id. 9, 2, 16 and 17.

INSCRIPTION, evidence. Something written or engraved.
     2. Inscriptions upon tombstones and other proper places, as rings, and the like, are held to be evidence of pedigree. Bull. N. P. 233 Cowp. 591; 10 East, R. 120 13 Ves. 145 Vin. Ab. Ev. T. b. 87: 3 Stark. Ev. 116.

References in periodicals archive ?
He has not told Hamilton's story; rather, he provides a glimpse into the practices by which individuals like Hamilton have been modified, made unavailable to us by particular inscriptive practices of literature, politics, and culture, emergent during the eighteenth century.
Therefore, race functioned as an inscriptive characteristic that ostensibly could not be changed, but in reality, many mixed groups became "White" through racial intermixture.
The dreaming, human agency and inscriptive practice.
The archive is by nature static, fixed, abstract, and inscriptive.
Faulkner dramatizes this descriptive and inscriptive operation of race in Intruder in the Dust.
requires an inscriptive politics, through which a people struggles
Returning to Lambton's survey team, as it moves slowly across the waterlogged countryside near Tanjore in southern India in July 1808, we find a covert form of Gregory's inscriptive cultural 'entanglements' occurring almost as soon as the first trigonometrical sightings are carried out.
To the modernisation theorist, development consisted of a complex transition from traditional societies, based on multiplex, affective and inscriptive relationship, to modern society, based on role separation, rational relations and achieved statuses.