inseverable


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inseverable

adjective bound up with, impartible, indivisible, inextricable, infrangible, infusible, inseparable, insoluble, irresolvable, joined, one, unbreakable, undividable, united
See also: indivisible, inextricable, inseparable
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to the challenging party in that particular case were inseverable.
sought to apply in those enforcement actions were inseverable from other
It will not, however, help the judge when there is a fallback law declaring the enactment's sub-rules to be inseverable if the sub-rule in question is constitutional and no other sub-rule has yet been declared unconstitutional.
He speculates that it is out of this cryptoerotic fascination with 'queer, inseverable things' from which his 'gift for numbers grew'.
But I suggest that there are a number of reasons why it would be reasonable for a Court to come to the conclusion that, for the purposes of the application of the Judicial Non-Interference Rule, a Catholic School Board, even a publicly-funded one, ought to be viewed as an inseverable part of the institutional Roman Catholic Church.
The act overrides Illinois law by stating that any portion of the act is inseverable from any other.
The role of human behavior, as involved in making measurements, is an inseverable part of the field.
Whereas his first home-bound passage grounds his cultural conscience in the maternal injunction to "play properly" at soldiering, the second passage during early adulthood documents the extent to which repressive ties to past lessons are inseverable for the officer/homosexual.
regulatory bargain implies that the challenged provision is inseverable.
Although the pro-inseverability forces disclaimed such ulterior motives and advanced several plausible policy arguments in favor of inseverability, (15) it was not lost on most observers that the very legislators who were now so strongly supporting an inseverable campaign finance bill had until recently opposed any campaign finance reform bill at all.
Among these women an early candidate for sainthood, unquestionably the most famous personality of the Franciscan order's penitential movement in Italy, Margherita the penitent sinner, a "new Magdalen," was also bound by inseverable ties to the small Tuscan town of Cortona, a relationship closely examined in Andre Vauchez' two chapters.
201) Finally, the court found that the unconstitutional provision was inseverable from the remainder of the rule and set aside the entire rule.