insult

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insult

noun abuse, affront, aspersion, atrocity, defamation, defilement, derision, diatribe, disparagement, enormity, impertinence, incivility, indignity, insolence, mockery, offense, offensive remark, open disrespect, provocation, rebuff, revilement, ridicule, rudeness, slap in the face, slight, snub, uncomplimentary remarks, vulgarity

insult

verb affront, be rude to, denigrate, deride, disparage, display insolence toward, disregard, flout, hector, hold in derision, humiliate, jeer, mock, offend, pique, provoke, raise one's dander, rebuff, ridicule, treat with contemptuousness, treat with discourresy, treat with indignity
See also: affront, aspersion, bait, contumely, defamation, defilement, denigrate, diatribe, disoblige, disparage, disregard, disrespect, flout, harass, hector, humiliate, jeer, mock, pique, provocation, provoke, rebuff, revilement
References in classic literature ?
I should not like to have it pasted over with their great bills, and as to making Jack and Captain race about to the public-houses to bring up half-drunken voters, why, I think 'twould be an insult to the horses.
Uncle Silas knowed how powerful he was, and how little chance he had against such a man, and he was scared and worried, and done everything he could think of to smooth him over and get him to be good to him: he even took his no-account brother Jubiter on the farm and give him wages and stinted his own family to pay them; and Jubiter done everything his brother could contrive to insult Uncle Silas, and fret and worry him, and try to drive Uncle Silas into doing him a hurt, so as to injure Uncle Silas with the people.
But Sancho did not so fully approve of his master's admonition as to let it pass without saying in reply, "Senor, I am a man of peace, meek and quiet, and I can put up with any affront because I have a wife and children to support and bring up; so let it be likewise a hint to your worship, as it cannot be a mandate, that on no account will I draw sword either against clown or against knight, and that here before God I forgive the insults that have been offered me, whether they have been, are, or shall be offered me by high or low, rich or poor, noble or commoner, not excepting any rank or condition whatsoever.
Should a war be the result of the precarious situation of European affairs, and all the unruly passions attending it be let loose on the ocean, our escape from insults and depredations, not only on that element, but every part of the other bordering on it, will be truly miraculous.
Above them raced a bevy of screaming, chattering monkeys, hurling taunts and insults at the Mangani, and encouragement and advice to the girl.
Each went howling at his own sweet will, yelping insults at me, or giving whatever other vent this new inspiration of brandy demanded.
Thence, introduced into a half- subterranean gallery, he became, on the part of those who had brought him, the object of the grossest insults and the harshest treatment.
s half-filled snuff-box, -- scarcely had this occurred when Marseilles began, in spite of the authorities, to rekindle the flames of civil war, always smouldering in the south, and it required but little to excite the populace to acts of far greater violence than the shouts and insults with which they assailed the royalists whenever they ventured abroad.
The cries of the two parties were now in sound an interchange of scathing insults.
Yet I am surprised that our Thedor should continue to overlook insults of the kind that he endures.
I speak of that spiteful and intriguing Italian -- of the pedant who has tried to put on his own head a crown which he stole from under a pillow -- of the scoundrel who calls his party the party of the king -- who wants to send the princes of the blood to prison, not daring to kill them, as our great cardinal -- our cardinal did -- of the miser, who weighs his gold pieces and keeps the clipped ones for fear, though he is rich, of losing them at play next morning -- of the impudent fellow who insults the queen, as they say -- so much the worse for her -- and who is going in three months to make war upon us, in order that he may retain his pensions; is that the master whom you propose to me?
These insults irritated Pearson's temper for the moment; they entered also into his heart, and became imperceptible but powerful workers towards an end which his most secret thought had not yet whispered.