interested

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interested

adjective affected, affiliated, associated, biased, concerned, connected, directly affected by the outtome of a controversy, having investments in, influenced, involved, one-sided, partial, partisan, prejudiced, prepossessed, solicitous, undetached
Associated concepts: interested juror, interested party, interrsted witness
See also: eager, inquisitive, interrogative, one-sided, partial, receptive, unjust
References in periodicals archive ?
First and foremost, the "worship" of "reality" strikes Vivian as "monstrous" (38) and "vulgar" (44) because the "foul sore and festering wound" that naturalist writers like Guy de Maupassant and Emile Zola delight in revealing to their readers indicates an aesthetic interestedness that debars their texts from being considered true art (39).
More strikingly, it underscores the interestedness of memory and recall.
Throughout, she argues that by defining themselves against domesticity, sentimentalism, interestedness, subjectivity, or consumerism, male and female modern professionals paradoxically were unable to transcend these degraded feminine concepts.
7) The Foucaultian elements of Guillory's argument are evident in his assertion that the ideology of canon-formation has to do with the covert interestedness on the part of the critic, i.
The scholarly interestedness that becomes more manifest as time progresses is not a regrettable trace of the subjective prejudices from which historians tightly ought to have freed themselves.
Totalitarianism wishes to annihilate plural modes of interestedness and discursive interaction.
And it is important to note that the very fact of partial knowledges -- partial in the senses of incompleteness but also of interestedness, even bias -- means that our disciplines must throw out what were once their epistemological foundations.
3] Poststructuralist insight into the interestedness of all discourse also contains a blindness that does not seem to allow this knowledge to be reflexively applied to the narratives it tells about itself.
His lock on the commonplaces of life, the goings on, the view, the news, was the same interestedness that enabled Chekhov to write brightly from the spa where he was dying, "You don't see a single decently dressed German woman, the lack of taste is depressing.
Da-sein, on the other hand, has facticity, an active but non-cognitive and non-psychological principle of interestedness (or the possibility of interestedness) in its own being.
Frick (1992) made a similar distinction between interestedness and interestingness.
Thus, it both introduces an implicit classism that ignores the social interestedness of distinctions between manual and intellectual labor and repeats the masculinist dismissal of life-maintenance activity.