interpreters of the law

See: judiciary
References in classic literature ?
One is that the judges, who are to be the interpreters of the law, might receive an improper bias, from having given a previous opinion in their revisionary capacities; the other is that by being often associated with the Executive, they might be induced to embark too far in the political views of that magistrate, and thus a dangerous combination might by degrees be cemented between the executive and judiciary departments.
It is however beyond the scope of jurisprudence to fuel the historically evinced 'dissensions' between the legislative and the judiciary bodies, as interpreters of the law.
Perhaps the title is misleading; the bulk of the book is about early Christian interpreters of the Law, as reflected in the biblical Gospels, their sources, and (briefly) the Gospel of Thomas.
Angelo's rhetorical manipulations here confirm Lucio's warning about self-motivated interpreters of the law, which holds that one might use legal prerogative to make the laws, even those with divine sanction, serve private (human, political) interests.
Gradually, Islamic law was "frozen," so that the interpreters of the law could no longer apply their independent reasoning to it.
obligation The ruling therefore is a statement that those who hold the power, the gatekeepers, producers and interpreters of the laws, can point out and try to change failed policies on behalf of those harmed by it.
Strict interpreters of the laws of physics adamantly state that pure horizontal or vertical pitch movement is impossible, and that all breaking balls are technically slurve variants.
Bumgardner said, "I am calling the Attorney Generals, the prosecuting District Attorneys, the interpreters of the laws and those enforcing those interpretations to accountability.