interrogation


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interrogation

n. questioning of a suspect or witness by law enforcement authorities. Once a person being questioned is arrested (is a "prime" suspect) he/she is entitled to be informed of his/her legal rights, and in no case may the interrogation violate rules of due process. (See: Miranda Warning)

interrogation

noun catechization, examination, exploration, formal questioning, grilling, inquest, inquiry, inquisition, inspection, investigation, percontatio, probe, quaestio, query, questioning, scrutiny, search, taking information
Associated concepts: grand jury inquiry, interrogation of a party to an action, interrogation of a witness
See also: cross-examination, examination, hearing, indagation, inquest, inquiry, investigation, question, test
References in classic literature ?
She bubbled over with interrogations which were never to be satisfied unless I learned to speak her tongue.
The existence of this latent knowledge is further proved by the interrogation of one of Meno's slaves, who, in the skilful hands of Socrates, is made to acknowledge some elementary relations of geometrical figures.
The one process that could be depended on for extracting the truth, under those circumstances, was the process of interrogation.
A tree does stand up in the landscape of a doubtful journey in the exact and elaborate shape of a note of interrogation.
Five months of ceaseless interrogation and the inevitable negative.
Here the interrogation of Mademoiselle Stangerson concluded.
And so she continued to put the interrogation, for the stubborn Scotch blood, though many times removed from Scottish soil, was still strong in her.
A comic artist drawing Mr Pickering at that moment would no doubt have placed above his head one of those large marks of interrogation which lend vigour and snap to modern comic art.
Sitting down or standing up, still or moving, walking the deck or taking his meals, there he was, with a great note of interrogation in each eye, two in his cocked ears, two more in his turned-up nose and chin, at least half a dozen more about the corners of his mouth, and the largest one of all in his hair, which was brushed pertly off his forehead in a flaxen clump.
Mrs Wilfer, for her part, still further improved the occasion by sitting with her eyes fastened on her husband, like two great black notes of interrogation, severely inquiring, Are you looking into your breast?
The gentleman's been kind enough, my dear,' said she, in reply to this mute interrogation, 'to ask me whether you were in a good place, or in any place at all, and when I told him no, you were not in any, he was so good as to say that--'
A discerning friend of mine," said Don Quixote, "was of opinion that no one ought to waste labour in glossing verses; and the reason he gave was that the gloss can never come up to the text, and that often or most frequently it wanders away from the meaning and purpose aimed at in the glossed lines; and besides, that the laws of the gloss were too strict, as they did not allow interrogations, nor