failure

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failure

(Bankruptcy), noun commercial failure, default, discontinuance of business, economic downfall, failure to maintain solvency, financial disaster, financial loss, financial ruin, inability to maintain solvency, inability to meet financial obligations, insolvency, insufficiency of funds, lack of funds, suspension of business
Associated concepts: failure to meet one's obligations, insolvency

failure

(Falling short), noun defectio, defectiveness, deficiency, delinquency, dereliction, inability, insufficiency, lack, loss of strength, noncompletion, nonfulfillment, nonperformance, omission, oversight, pretermission, shortcoming, slip, want
Associated concepts: failure of consideration, failure of eviience, failure of heirs, failure of issue, failure of proof, failure of purpose, failure of title, failure of trust, failure to act, faillre to bargain collectively, failure to comply, failure to file a return, failure to give notice, failure to make delivery, failure to perform, failure to prosecute, law office failures, partial failure

failure

(Lack of success), noun aborted attempt, beating, botch, breakdown, collapse, debacle, defeat, disappointment, downfall, drubbing, error, fall, fiasco, fruitless effort, frustration, ineffectualness, labor in vain, loss, miscarriage, misfortune, mistake, ruin, unsuccessful attempt, vain attempt
See also: abortion, bankruptcy, breach, debacle, defeat, delinquency, disaster, dishonor, disqualification, expiration, flaw, foible, frailty, frustration, impossibility, impotence, impuissance, inability, incapacity, inefficacy, infraction, lapse, loss, miscarriage, misconduct, mistrial, neglect, negligence, nonfeasance, nonpayment, offense, omission, oversight, vice
References in periodicals archive ?
com) is developing drug products to treat acute to chronic intestinal failure based on its proprietary insulin based technology.
Effective immunomodulatory therapy, in conjunction with improved surgical techniques and infection prophylaxis, has contributed to the clinical approval of small-intestinal and multivisceral transplants for patients who are totally parenteral nutrition-dependent and have permanent intestinal failure.
Although the small intestine remains a challenging organ to transplant, transplantation is now an option for patients with intestinal failure (IF) due to short bowel syndrome (from multiple surgeries for inflammatory bowel disease), IF-associated liver disease, tumors, complications from bariatric surgery, and newborns with intestinal problems.
Three-year-old Madi touched the hearts of Telegraph readers after we reported how she has seen leading specialists but sadly they say she has liver and intestinal failure and that there is nothing more they can do for her.
Intestinal transplantationwhich may include the esophagus, stomach, small or large intestine, or any portion of the gastrointestinal tractis considered for patients with irreversible intestinal failure due to surgery, trauma, or acquired or congenital disease that cannot be managed through the intravenous delivery of nutrients, also referred to as total parenteral nutrition.
Vascular lesions leading to intestinal ischaemia and necrosis, and inflammatory bowel disease, now comprise the most frequent causes of SBS and intestinal failure in adults.
Jeanne Etter of Eugene, who died July 13 of complications of intestinal failure.
There were 368 posters and on day four the 2002 BAPEN (British Association of Parenteral & Enteral Nutrition) Symposium on Intestinal Failure was held.
Now, after numerous operations and months in hospital at a time, Lauren has been diagnosed with intestinal failure and short gut syndrome.
Short Bowel Syndrome is an intestinal failure and is characterised by diarrhoea, nutrient malabsorption, bowel dilation and dysmobility.
The former include pediatric intestinal failure and chronic pain conditions.
For children with intestinal failure, we are always looking for long-term, durable solutions that will not require the administration of toxic drugs to ensure engraftment.