intonation

(redirected from intonations)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

intonation

noun accentuation, cadence, delivery, inflection, phonation, pitch, quality, resonance, sound, tonality, tone, tone of voice, vocalism, voice
Associated concepts: demeanor
See also: inflection, stress
References in classic literature ?
Walters was very earnest of mien, and very sincere and honest at heart; and he held sacred things and places in such reverence, and so separated them from worldly matters, that unconsciously to himself his Sunday-school voice had acquired a peculiar intonation which was wholly absent on week-days.
Naseby,' he concluded, with an intonation that would have made his fortune on the stage, so just, so sad, so dignified, so like a man of the world and a philosopher, 'and you see a man who is content.
The old man motioned me in with his right hand with a courtly gesture, saying in excellent English, but with a strange intonation.
You read, I will suppose, attentively enough; but you cannot see the speaker's white, sincere face in the bright circle of the little lamp, nor hear the intonation of his voice.
For the iambic is, of all measures, the most colloquial: we see it in the fact that conversational speech runs into iambic lines more frequently than into any other kind of verse; rarely into hexameters, and only when we drop the colloquial intonation.
Yes, monsieur," replied the citizen, giving a still fainter intonation to his voice.
True," said Madame de Villefort, with an intonation of voice which it is impossible to describe; "is it not unjust -- shamefully unjust?
Could not distinguish the words, but was convinced by the intonation that the speaker was an Italian.
Forgive me," said Raoul, arresting the giddy girl, and giving to his voice an intonation, the gravity of which contrasted with that of Montalais; "forgive me, but may I inquire the name of the protector you speak of; for if protection be extended towards you, Mademoiselle Montalais, -- for which, indeed, so many reasons exist," added Raoul, bowing, "I do not see that the same reasons exist why Mademoiselle de la Valliere should be similarly cared for.
His mother had two long conversations with Mills on his passage through Paris and had heard of me (I knew how that thick man could speak of people, he interjected ambiguously) and his mother, with an insatiable curiosity for anything that was rare (filially humorous accent here and a softer flash of teeth), was very anxious to have me presented to her(courteous intonation, but no teeth).
From the intonation of the words, she guessed, with her woman's quick intuition, at their meaning; but she quite failed to follow, when, becoming more pressing, he continued to urge his suit in a mixture of the grossest animal passion and ridiculous threats.
How coldly and pitilessly -- with what an even, calm intonation, presaging, and enforcing tranquility in the men -- with what accurately measured interval fell those cruel words: