invention

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invention

noun brain child, coinage, composition, concoction, contraption, contrivance, creation, creative effort, creative fabrication, discovery, fabrication, finding, handiwork, improvisation, innovation, inventum, origination, product, reperta
See also: contrivance, creation, device, expedient, false pretense, falsehood, falsification, fiction, figment, formation, innovation, lie, myth, nascency, origination, pretense, pretext, product, story, strategy, subreption

INVENTION. A contrivance; a discovery. It is in this sense this word is used in the patent laws of the United States. 17 Pet. 228; S. C. 1 How. U. S. 202. It signifies not something which has been found ready made, but something which, in consequence of art or accident, has been formed; for the invention must relate to some new or useful art, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, not before known or used by others. Act of July 4, 1836, 4 Sharsw. continuation of Story's L. U.S. 2506; 1 Mason, R. 302; 4 Wash. C. C. R. 9. Vide Patent. By invention, the civilians understand the finding of some things which had not been lost; they must either have abandoned, or they must have never belonged to any one, as a pearl found on the sea shore. Lec. Elem Sec. 350.

References in periodicals archive ?
In the rhetorical tradition, imitation is recognized as a generative, inventional resource that allows an individual to "take experience apart and put it together in new ways" (Corbett 1971, 250).
Topics include the role of the late William Norwood Brigance (also of Wabash College) in advancing the understanding of democracy and rhetoric, the possible contributions of classical and neo-classical traditions of rhetorical theory in advancing public deliberation, the potentials of rhetorical pedagogy in Lithuania, race and gender in the US presidential campaign rhetoric of 2004, the institutional contexts of rhetorical production and their influence on policy formation in the US government, and the role of rhetoric as an inventional resource in civil society.
13; Christine Oravec, 'An Inventional Archaeology of "A Fable for Tomorrow,"' in Waddell, ed.
See "An Inventional Archaeology of 'A Fable for Tomorrow,'" in And No Birds Sing: Rhetorical Analyses of Rachel Carson's "Silent Spring," ed.