irony

(redirected from ironies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

irony

noun cynicism, ironia, mockery, sarcasm, satire

IRONY, rhetoric. A term derived from the Greek, which signifies dissimulation. It is a refined species of ridicule, which, under the mask of honest simplicity or ignorance, exposes the faults and errors of others, by seeming to adopt or defend them.
     2. In libels, irony may convey imputations more effectually than direct assertion, and render the publication libelous. Hob. 215; Hawk. B. 1, c. 73, s. 4; 3 Chit. Cr. Law, 869, Bac. Ab. Libel, A 3.

References in periodicals archive ?
These ironies are becoming more apparent, and this is made easier by the intersection between the crisis in the region, and particularly Syria, and the fluctuations in the domestic situation in Lebanon, between the government and the opposition, which is open to all possibilities.
Whatever the explanation, ironies and embarrassments abound and wonderment increases.
This only heightens the ironies inherent in La Onda Chicana's "fusion of rhythmic and visual sensibilities that combined elements of Mexican and Latin American culture interpreted through the lens of the counter-culture abroad" (p.
There are serious ironies as well as comic ones, and the use of the Song of Songs for someone who is cold and smells of death is one of them; so is the naming of what is visibly and palpably bread and wine as body and blood, an irony that only deepens as bread and wine are understood as the elements of the Jewish kiddush, and the Mass as the transubstantiation of a Jewish ritual of nature and artifact into a Christian ritual of sacrifice and resurrection.
One of the rich ironies of the current abortion debate is that those who favor further restrictions on abortion invoke the awful bind young women are in because of the very restrictions the anti-choice legislators have imposed.
He passes over the sotsart ironies of Komar and Melamid, proposing rather the grotesque realism of Geli Korzhev as SR's culmination.
This past year, as lawmakers continued their inexorable drive to further privatize social services for children, ironies stemming from the country's stance on the caretaking of young children multiplied.
Among the most illuminating examples are ironies resulting from the author's knowledge and comparison of Laurence Olivier's 1944 film of Henry V and Kenneth Branagh's 1989 movie version of the same Shakespearean play.
One of the ironies of NIMBY is that, because today's work force is more multicultural than ever, keeping out the nouveau middle class in the name of doing good has emerged as the only "politically correct" form of housing discrimination.
They're unable to point out the obvious ironies of our modern condition: right-wing creationists supporting a war over fossil fuels -- which can't exist if you believe the world was created in seven days