irony


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Related to irony: dramatic irony

irony

noun cynicism, ironia, mockery, sarcasm, satire

IRONY, rhetoric. A term derived from the Greek, which signifies dissimulation. It is a refined species of ridicule, which, under the mask of honest simplicity or ignorance, exposes the faults and errors of others, by seeming to adopt or defend them.
     2. In libels, irony may convey imputations more effectually than direct assertion, and render the publication libelous. Hob. 215; Hawk. B. 1, c. 73, s. 4; 3 Chit. Cr. Law, 869, Bac. Ab. Libel, A 3.

References in classic literature ?
The statements of the Memorabilia respecting the trial and death of Socrates agree generally with Plato; but they have lost the flavour of Socratic irony in the narrative of Xenophon.
Some of our caricaturists might, he says, take a lesson in the irony of grotesque by comparing the reality and the picture.
As she concluded, the young lady curtisied to the youth in a manner that contradicted, by its flattery, the forced irony of her remark.
A laugh frigidly jeering; a look lazily mutinous; gentlemanlike irony, patrician resentment.
The old man gave another of his remarkable laughs, which partook so largely of exultation, mirth, and irony, and, shaking his head, he turned, with his rifle at a trail, and moved into the forest with steps that were between a walk and a trot.
Again I began my explanations, but the Frenchman only fidgeted and rolled his head about as he listened with an expression of manifest and unconcealed irony on his face.
Monk, astonished at this language, which established between him and the French gentleman equality at least, raised his piercing eye to the stranger's face, and with a sensible irony conveyed by the inflection of his voice alone, for not a muscle of his face moved, -- "I thank you, monsieur," said he; "but, in the first place, to whom have I the honor of speaking?
Yes - some day," she repeated in a breath in which there was no irony but rather hesitation, reluctance what did I know?
It was possible she intended her omission as an impertinence, a visible irony, to show how she could overreach people who attempted to overreach her.
Her smile had for him, with the words, the particular mild irony with which he found half her talk suffused; an irony without bitterness and that came, exactly, from her having so much imagination - not, like the cheap sarcasms with which one heard most people, about the world of "society," bid for the reputation of cleverness, from nobody's really having any.
Her indignation was too great for passion; only irony or satire would meet the situation.
she cried in all the irony of sorrow, as she turned herself aside.