itinerant


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itinerant

adjective ambulant, ambulatory, passing, peripatetic, journeying, moving, traveling, wandering, wayfaring
Associated concepts: itinerant dealer, itinerant merchant, itinerant trader, itinerant vendor

itinerant

noun drifter, peripatetic, traveler, rambler, roamer, rover, runabout, voyager, wanderer
See also: moving

ITINERANT. Travelling or taking a journey. In England there were formerly judges called Justices itinerant, who were sent with commissions into certain counties to try causes.

References in classic literature ?
Lawler was an elderly man, shrewd, silent, and self-contained, clad in an old black frock coat, which with his soft felt hat and ragged, grizzled beard gave him a general resemblance to an itinerant preacher.
It was not difficult to divine that they were of a class of itinerant showmen--exhibitors of the freaks of Punch--for, perched cross-legged upon a tombstone behind them, was a figure of that hero himself, his nose and chin as hooked and his face as beaming as usual.
An itinerant actor and fledgling playwright, Griffith joined Biograph in early 1908, first as a writer and then as an actor.
The Itinerant University is currently organized in the following courses:
In this most recent volume, Some Wild Visions: Autobiographies by Female Itinerant Evangelists in Nineteenth-Century America, Elizabeth Elkin Grammer, an English professor, provides a careful, literary analysis of seven autobiographies by nineteenth-century itinerant women evangelists--Jarena Lee, Zilpha Elaw, Nancy Towle, Lydia Sexton, Laura Haviland, Julia Foote, and Amanda Berry Smith.
We would advise customers to be very wary of purchasing furniture from itinerant traders," he said.
Every year Birmingham is plagued by the problem of itinerants illegally setting up camp, causing residents to bombard the council with complaints asking for them to be moved on.
This Gospel's announcement, brought by itinerant apostles like Paul and Silas, provoked a moral transformation in the listeners.
Because the Poor, both male and female, became itinerant preachers of penance in opposition to a prohibition of the archbishop of Lyon, Pope Lucius III in 1184 condemned them as schismatics.
Seemingly, by listening to an itinerant, well-heeled failure talk about his screw-ups, people feel less devastated by their own mistakes.
Some of the writing is on predictable topics: the cultural consequences of Christopher Columbus, the itinerant radicalism of Tom Paine, and the roots of May Day.
It seems that the earliest followers of Jesus included bands of itinerant preachers who in imitation of Jesus traveled from town to town and lived by the kindness of Christians or sympathetic strangers and worked miracles, prophesied, and proclaimed the Good News.