jeopardy


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Related to jeopardy: Wheel of fortune

Jeopardy

Danger; hazard; peril. In a criminal action, the danger of conviction and punishment confronting the defendant.

A person is in jeopardy when he or she is placed on trial before a court of competent jurisdiction upon an indictment or information sufficient in form and substance to uphold a conviction, and a jury is charged or sworn. Jeopardy attaches after a valid indictment is found and a petit jury is sworn to try the case.

Cross-references

Double Jeopardy.

jeopardy

n. peril, particularly danger of being charged with or convicted of a particular crime. The U. S. Constitution guarantees in the Fifth Amendment that no one can "be put in jeopardy of life or limb" for the same offense. Thus, once a person as been acquitted, he/she may not be charged again for that crime. However, if there was mistrial, hung jury, or reversal of conviction on appeal (if not declared innocent in the ruling), the defendant may be charged with the crime again and tried again. In a few situations a defendant is not "in jeopardy" of being tried for a violation of a similar (but different) federal criminal (penal) statute based on some of the same circumstances as a state prosecution, such as violation of a murder victim's civil rights, as was done in the case against the killer of civil rights leader Medgar Evers. (See: double jeopardy)

jeopardy

noun crisis, danger, dangerous situation, endangerment, hazard, imperilment, insecurity, instability, menace, peril, perilousness, precariousness, risk, threat, uncertainty, unsafety, vulnerability
Associated concepts: double jeopardy, former jeopardy, placed in jeopardy
Foreign phrases: Nemo bis punitur pro eodem delicto.No one can be punished twice for the same offense.
See also: danger, hazard, peril, predicament, risk, threat, venture

jeopardy

see DOUBLE JEOPARDY.

JEOPARDY. Peril, danger. 2. This is the meaning attached to this word used in the act establishing and regulating the post office department. The words of the act are, "or if, in effecting such robbery of the mail the first time, the offender shall wound the person having the custody thereof, or put his life in jeopardy by the use of dangerous weapons, such offender shall suffer death." 3 Story's L. U. S. 1992. Vide Baldw. R. 93-95.
     3. The constitution declares that no person shall "for the same offence, be twice put in jeopardy of life and limb." The meaning of this is, that the party shall, not be tried a second time for the same offence after he has once been convicted or acquitted of the offence charged, by the verdict of a jury, and judgment has passed thereon for or against him; but it does not mean that he shall not be tried for the offence, if the jury have been discharged from necessity or by consent, without giving any verdict; or, if having given a verdict, judgment has been arrested upon it, or a new trial has been granted in his favor; for, in such a case, his life and limb cannot judicially be said to have been put in jeopardy. 4 Wash. C. C. R. 410; 9 Wheat. R. 579; 6 Serg. & Rawle, 577; 3. Rawle, R. 498; 3 Story on the Const. Sec. 1781. Vide 2 Sumn. R. 19. This great privilege is secured by the common law. Hawk. P. C., B. 2, 35; 4 Bl. Com. 335.
     4. This was the Roman law, from which it has been probably engrafted upon the common law. Vide Merl. Rep. art. Non bis in idem. Qui de crimine publico accusationem deductus est, says the Code, 9, 2, 9, ab alio super eodem crimine deferri non potest. Vide article Non bis in idem.

References in classic literature ?
No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use without just compensation.
Was not your frail existence often put in jeopardy by this same clumsy, headstrong lad, who would toss you disrespectfully aside that he--not satisfied with one--might hold both hands and gaze up into the loved eyes?
But it is pleasing to believe that at the time I looked - what I felt - as though all I valued upon earth were in jeopardy.
You will pardon my bluntness, but our lives are all in jeopardy here, and when we get your father back something must be done to impress upon him the dangers to which he exposes you as well as himself by his absent-mindedness.
That her life was equally in jeopardy in the savage jungle to which she must have flown did not impress him as it would have you or me, since to Tarzan the jungle was not a dangerous place--he considered one safer there than in Paris or London by night.
Let me now acknowledge my indebtedness; and if promises be not vain from one whose life and liberty are in grave jeopardy, accept my assurance of the great reward that awaits you at the hand of my father in Helium.
One who wishes to save the honor of your name takes this means to warn you that the sanctity of your home is this minute in jeopardy.
An Assassin is not in jeopardy when tried in California.
Thus, after the death of the King, "the realm stood in great jeopardy a long while, for every lord that was mighty of men made him strong, and many weened to have been King.
During the former voyage of the Adventure and Beagle in 1826 to 1830, Captain Fitz Roy seized on a party of natives, as hostages for the loss of a boat, which had been stolen, to the great jeopardy of a party employed on the survey; and some of these natives, as well as a child whom he bought for a pearl-button, he took with him to England, determining to educate them and instruct them in religion at his own expense.
There were rumors that a very important station was in jeopardy, and its chief, Mr.
His disinterested advice has enabled me largely to increase my income, without placing a farthing of the principal in jeopardy.