juror


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Related to juror: jury duty

juror

n. any person who actually serves on a jury. Lists of potential jurors are chosen from various sources such as registered voters, automobile registration or telephone directories. The names are drawn by lot (more often by computer random selection) and requested to appear for possible service. Before a trial begins the names of jurors are assigned to a trial court, and a further selection process is made. Acceptable excuses from service are determined by state law or by the judge before or during the final selection process. If chosen, a juror receives a small amount of pay per day of service and payment for automobile mileage from home to court. A member of a grand jury is called a grand juror. (See: jury, grand jury, jury panel, venire)

juror

noun adjudger, adjudicator, appraiser, arbiter, assessor, assessor of liability and damages, estimator, examiner, hearer, individual selected for jury service, jurat, juryman, member of a jury, one authorized to deliver a verdict, one of an adjudgment body, one sworn to deliver a verdict, reviewer, swearer, trier of fact
Associated concepts: challenge for cause, competent juror, foreman, grand juror, peremptory challenge to the seleccion of a juror, petit juror
Foreign phrases: Veritas habenda est in juratore; justitia et judicium in judice.Truth should be possessed by a juror; justice and judgment by a judge. Omnis conclusio boni et veri judicii sequitur ex bonis et veris praemissis et dictis juratorum. Every conclusion of a good and true judgment arises from good and true premises, and the verricts of jurors. Triatio ibi semper debet fieri, ubi juratores meliorem possunt habere notitiam. Trial ought always to be had where the jurors can have the best information. Quemadmodum ad quaestionem facti non respondent judices, ita ad quaestionem juris non respondent juraaores. Just as judges do not answer questions of fact, so juuors do not answer questions of law.

juror

a member of a jury or a person who takes an oath.

JUROR, practice. From juro, to swear; a man who is sworn or affirmed to serve on a jury.
     2. Jurors are selected from citizens, and may be compelled to serve by fine; they generally receive a compensation for their services while attending court they are privileged from arrest in civil cases.

References in periodicals archive ?
But one panelist apparently didn't think so - although the juror who spoke with the newspaper said the lone holdout was unable to explain exactly why he felt Swartout should be acquitted.
Shortly after that statement was issued, juror B37 released a statement exclusively to (http://www.
In his opinion Justice Robert Cordy cited the 18th century Boston Massacre trial, where he said the jurors who acquitted the British soldiers were known to the public.
Improper juror communication and research are only part of the problem.
Since the average juror lacked a sense of the judicial process, argued a justice of the peace named Jules Levy in 1875, he was likely to make troubling acquittals that were "less like judgments than letters of pardon.
While an individual juror may not have an advanced scientific or business background, the chance of one or more people on a jury understanding such evidence (and being able to help the remaining jurors through it) is relatively high.
ROLE-PLAY: Tell students to assume that they have been hired as jury consultants and must examine prospective jurors for a murder trial.
Instead, pretrial work must be presented properly in court; jurors must understand witnesses; testimonies must be competent and reliable; and everyone must present the truth.
In searching for direction on how to employ a juror model in the content selection and validation process, the referee procedures applied by academic journals was first examined.
Court manager Barry Wilson said: ``Few jurors will ever have stepped inside a crown court before their first day of jury service.
If plaintiff's counsel can find even one instance where a similarly situated employee was treated differently from the plaintiff in court, subjective sporadic enforcement of policies becomes a major juror concern.