juvenile court


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

juvenile court

n. a special court or department of a trial court which deals with under-age defendants charged with crimes or who are neglected or out of the control of their parents. The normal age of these defendants is under 18, but juvenile court does not have jurisdiction in cases in which minors are charged as adults. The procedure in juvenile court is not always adversarial (although the minor is entitled to legal representation by a lawyer). It can be an attempt to involve parents or social workers and probation officers in the process to achieve positive results and save the minor from involvement in further crimes. However, serious crimes and repeated offenses can result in sentencing juvenile offenders to prison, with transfer to state prison upon reaching adulthood with limited maximum sentences. Where parental neglect or loss of control is a problem, the juvenile court may seek out foster homes for the juvenile, treating the child as a ward of the court. (See: court)

References in periodicals archive ?
This legislative purpose is not well served by a transfer order lacking in specifics that the appellate court is forced to speculate as to the juvenile court's reasons for finding transfer to be appropriate or the facts the juvenile court found to substantiate those reasons," Price wrote.
The costs are set in the individual care plans implemented at the time of a placement on behalf of a specific child in the custody and care of the juvenile court agency.
Neither jail officials nor juvenile court officials knew whether he had retained a lawyer.
To receive future funding, Rockdale County's Juvenile Court must "decrease felony commitments and short-term placements by 15 percent, and maintain 60 percent program completion," according to the report.
In addition to the lynching, Wells grew concerned about a related issue: the juvenile court movement.
The punitive, incarceration-based juvenile justice system of today would have appalled the founders of the original juvenile court, which opened in Chicago in 1899.
The matter came to the court from a 12-11-1 recommendation from the Juvenile Court Rules Committee to approve the proposed Rule 8.
Beginning with a brief history of the juvenile court, the first of which the author identifies as Cook County, Illinois, in 1899, the book traces the early courts that were fostered by "idealists and radical thinkers" who "took the high ground, seeking a true emancipation for delinquent and dependent children" to the harsher treatment of jail sentences and reform schools that other groups would endorse.
Wolcott's study of Detroit shows that Progressive reformism left its mark on police handling of delinquents, beginning even before the Detroit juvenile court was set up inl907.
The decision notes Juvenile Court Judge Richard Naranjo's statement about Harris' emotional state: ``Now, the situation at the snack bar was a situation where the .
Yet, by giving directions for future research, outlining proposals for reforms in the juvenile court, and repeatedly modeling thoughtful, critical policy analysis, the author shows why such misguided responses are no longer acceptable.
Teachers and students looking for a great primer on criminal law should look no further than this book, Jacobs, a lawyer and juvenile court judge, gives readers a comprehensive overview of the juvenile court system using an engaging writing style and a presentation format that is both entertaining and educational.

Full browser ?