juxtapose

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With six years of data, The Cedar Group provides insights on the deployment of workforce technologies by juxtaposing current results to past and future plans and investments to demonstrate the value returned.
Conclude with an index and bibliography and you have guides which are stand-alone references by topic, but lending to further interest and research, with chapters juxtaposing biographies of important people with social, cultural and historical introductions.
Detaching his visions from their sources by means of color, erasure, fragmentation, and distortion, juxtaposing them with a disembodied voice, and organizing the circulation between these two heterogeneous spaces, Perramant manages to establish painting in a real place, well beyond the surface, obeying his own rules and offering the viewer a real experience--something physical as well as spiritual.
The oversized presentation and striking arrangement juxtaposing art works with recipes, cultural insights and music assures recipients receive a full taste of Zydeco culture.
Without the horizontal and vertical transparency gained by layering and juxtaposing extensive planes of glass, Nouvel's architecture could not possibly be so changeable, so memorable and so inviting to passers-by.
Her analysis draws together a vast array of passages exemplifying the laurel topos, often from disparate parts of the collection, juxtaposing poems that are early and late.
Ozark's character development books represent something new for very early readers: each book uses animals and stories to emphasize a character-building point, juxtaposing a color drawing-enhanced story with a basic lesson for grades 2-3.
And while Reichek doesn't introduce any new languages, she sets old ones in play, mingling and juxtaposing the conventional with the novel and ably forging connections between the decorative and the intellectual--categories that Morris saw as regrettably divided, rather than joined, by technology.