keep company with


Also found in: Idioms.
See: accompany
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References in classic literature ?
Do not then deny my request, but make our house your resort and keep company with these young men; we are old friends, and you will be quite at home with us.
You and I and Joe would have wanted nothing then, and Joe and I would perhaps have gone partners when I was out of my time, and I might even have grown up to keep company with you, and we might have sat on this very bank on a fine Sunday, quite different people.
At those times, I would decide conclusively that my disaffection to dear old Joe and the forge, was gone, and that I was growing up in a fair way to be partners with Joe and to keep company with Biddy - when all in a moment some confounding remembrance of the Havisham days would fall upon me, like a destructive missile, and scatter my wits again.
As the conversation of fellows of this kind is of all others the most detestable to men of any sense, the cloth was no sooner removed than Mr Jones withdrew, and a little barbarously left poor Mrs Whitefield to do a penance, which I have often heard Mr Timothy Harris, and other publicans of good taste, lament, as the severest lot annexed to their calling, namely, that of being obliged to keep company with their guests.
He looked at the old chair, and thought it quite too shabby to keep company with a new set of mahogany chairs and an aristocratic sofa which had just arrived from London.
The occasion of this interruption we can only explain by resuming the adventures of another set of our characters; for, like old Ariosto, we do not pique ourselves upon continuing uniformly to keep company with any one personage of our drama.
But if you keep company with a disloyal man, we might think that you were disloyal, too.
But - I shall be sent to keep company with unfortunate M.
Eric Rowan once said of his work: "Grainger creates a world of the imagination; a world in which ivory towers mingle with hot dogs; where the ideas of Breughel and Schongauer keep company with the tracks of snails and slugs; and in which medieval machines are contrasted with letters to a friend.