lacerated


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References in classic literature ?
Thus Flora on one occasion had been reduced to rage and despair, had her most secret feelings lacerated, had obtained a view of the utmost baseness to which common human nature can descend--I won't say e propos de bottes as the French would excellently put it, but literally e propos of some mislaid cheap lace trimmings for a nightgown the romping one was making for herself.
I was once, I remember, called to a patient who had received a violent contusion in his tibia, by which the exterior cutis was lacerated, so that there was a profuse sanguinary discharge; and the interior membranes were so divellicated, that the os or bone very plainly appeared through the aperture of the vulnus or wound.
The kidnapper undid the bloody wrappings and looked at his lacerated hand.
The backs of his hands were bruised and lacerated, while his face was streaming blood from a gash near the temple.
Then the calf of his leg was badly lacerated and looked as though it had been mangled by a bulldog.
Alas, how that laughing lacerated my bowels and cut into my heart!
Her pride was too lacerated to permit her wholly to return in memory to the other Billy whom she loved.
I could enlarge this catalogue with broken arms, and broken legs, and gashed flesh, and missing teeth, and lacerated backs, and bites of dogs, and brands of red-hot irons innumerable: but as my readers will be sufficiently sickened and repelled already, I will turn to another branch of the subject.
At length, Madame Rigaud, in an access of fury that I must ever deplore, threw herself upon me with screams of passion (no doubt those that were overheard at some distance), tore my clothes, tore my hair, lacerated my hands, trampled and trod the dust, and finally leaped over, dashing herself to death upon the rocks below.
Torn clothes, lacerated faces, dusty shoes, exhausted looks, and, above all, the horse.
Then she fled homeward as quickly as she could, torn and bleeding from the wounds of thorns and briars, but more lacerated in mind, and threw herself upon her bed, distracted.
As the first room of the show reminds us, Rains and Villegle began their decollages, which were frequently joint efforts, in 1949--ripping thick layers of posters lacerated by passersby from billboards and street walls and exhibiting the finds, most often mounted on canvas, as works of art.